Railways

Railway Employee Fatality near Saskatoon Saskatchewan

Date of Issue: April 15, 2015     
Advisory No. R2015-04-09

Topic

The following advisory is to inform provincially regulated railways of a railway related safety concern.

On April 9, 2015 a conductor with 29 years experience was killed on the job when he was struck by railway equipment.

The worker was struck by a freight train, that was proceeding east on the CN Watrous Subdivision, when he was performing a mid train set off on his own train.

The Transportation Safety Board (TSB) is in the process of investigating this event.

Compliance

In the performance of railway operations, rules and safe work procedures must be followed. As part of Section “H” in your Safety Management System (SMS) each railway should have procedures for compliance and proficiency testing in all disciplines and for record keeping and follow-up corrective action such as additional training.

Proficiency testing is performed by a supervisor and involves periodic observation of an employee's on-the-job performance for compliance to a set of core CROR rules and safe work practices outlined in the companies SWP or GOIs. Testing should be routinely performed for employees and managers who regularly work in the field.

Additional Information

The Sofa Working Group has posted the following recommendations.

In an effort to reduce injuries and fatalities, the Switching Operations Fatalities Analysis (SOFA- link below) working group recommends railway workers practice the following:

  1. Secure all equipment before action is taken.
  2. Protect employees against moving equipment.
  3. Discuss safety at the beginning of a job or when work changes.
  4. Communicate before action is taken.
  5. Mentor less experienced employees to perform service safely.

http://utu.org/switching-operations-fatality-analysis

All provincial railways should take a moment to review their own safety procedures.

For additional information please contact the BCSA Railway Safety Program administration at 778‐396‐2044 or email at bcsa.railway@safetyauthority.ca

Download printable version

________________________________________________

Eric Samuelson
Provincial Railway Safety Manager
British Columbia Safety Authority

Equipment Reflectorization Guidelines for British Columbia’s Heritage Railways

1.       Short Title

          For ease of reference, these Guidelines may be referred to as the Reflectorization Guidelines

 

2.       Purpose and Scope

          These Guidelines prescribe the minimum standards governing the specifications and the application of retroreflective material on railway equipment. The scope of these Guidelines applies to all railway companies subject to the jurisdiction of MOTI pursuant to the Railway Act (BC).

 

3.       Definitions

3.1.1 “BCSA” means British Columbia Safety Authority;

3.2     "damaged" means scratched, broken, chipped, peeled, or delaminated to such an extent as to no longer be effective;

3.3     "freight car" means a car, designed to carry freight on rail;

3.4     "locomotive" means a rail vehicle, propelled by any energy form, other than steam intended for the propulsion and or control of freight;

3.4.1 “MOTI” means the provincial Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure;

3.5     "obscured" means concealed, hidden, or covered up so all incoming light is blocked;

3.6     "railway company" means a railway or railway company subject to the Railway Act (BC);

3.7     "railway equipment" means any locomotive, freight car, caboose operated by a railway company;

3.7.1 “SMS” means Safety Management System;

3.8     "retroreflective material" means material as specified by the chromaticity coordinates of the American Society for Testing and Materials' (ASTM) Standard D 4956-01a for Type V Sheeting "Standard Specification for Retroreflective Sheeting for Traffic Control, as amended from time to time", or by an equivalent standard. The words retroflective sheeting and retroflective material are equivalent.

 

4.       Applicability

4.1     These Guidelines apply to all Canadian-owned railway equipment operated over a public or private highway-rail grade crossing by a railway company regulated under the Railway Safety Act (BC) with the exception of:

          1.       Equipment operated solely on tracks, inside a non-railway installation, that are not part of the general railway system of transportation; and,        

          2.     Cars and locomotives that are used exclusively in passenger service or tourist excursion trains.

 

5.       Qualifications of Railway Employees

5.1     A railway company shall ensure that all employees engaged in the application, inspection or maintenance of retroreflective material are fully conversant with the requirements of these Guidelines and associated railway company instructions.

6.       Implementation Requirements

6.1     Freight Cars

          All freight cars subject to these Guidelines must be equipped with retroreflective sheeting conforming to these Guidelines within seven years of the effective date of these Guidelines by following a railway company implementation schedule. The schedule will ensure that not less than twenty-five (25) percent of the total fleet will be equipped within the first twenty-four (24) months following the coming into force of these Guidelines and that not less than an additional fifteen (15) percent of the total fleet shall be completed each twelve (12) month period thereafter for the duration of the implementation period.

6.2     Locomotives

          All locomotives subject to these Guidelines must be equipped with retroreflective sheeting conforming to these Guidelines within four years of the effective date of these Guidelines by following a railway company implementation schedule. The schedule will ensure that not less than twenty-five (25) percent of the total fleet will be equipped during each 12 month period following the coming into force of these Guidelines.

6.3     Records

          A record of the railway equipment that is equipped with retroreflective material must be identified in the railway’s SMS.

 

7.       Characteristics of Retroreflective Sheeting

7.1     Construction

          Retroreflective sheeting shall consist of a smooth, flat, transparent exterior film with micro prismatic retroreflective elements embedded in or suspended beneath the film so as to form a non-exposed retroreflective optical system.

7.2     Colour

          Retroflective sheeting applied under these Guidelines must be white or yellow.

7.3     Performance

          Retroreflective sheeting applied under these Guidelines shall, when initially applied, meet the minimum photometric performance requirements specified in Table 1.

Table 1: Minimum Photometric Performance (Coefficient of Retroreflection (RA) in Candela/Lux/Meter²) Requirement for White or Yellow Retroreflective Sheeting.

Entrance Angle(degree)

Observation Angle 0.2 (degree) YELLOW

Observation Angle 0.2 (degree) WHITE

Observation Angle 0.5 (degree) YELLOW

Observation Angle 0.5 (degree) WHITE

-4

400

600

100

160

30

220

350

45

75

7.4     Certification

          The manufacturer's certification that the sheeting is a retroreflective sheeting and conforms to the requirements of Construction, Colour and Performance of subsections 7.1, 7.2, and 7.3 herein shall appear at least once on the exposed surface of each sheeting in the final application. The characters shall be a minimum of 3 mm high, and shall be permanently stamped, etched, molded, or printed within the product and each certification shall be spaced no more than four inches apart.

7.5     Alternative Technology

          Upon filing with the MOTI by a railway company, an alternative technology may be used providing it meets or exceeds an equivalent level of safety as established through a comprehensive scientific analysis. Such alternative technology will result in conspicuity and durability at least equal to sheeting described in Construction Colour and Performance of subsections 7.1, 7.2, and 7.3 herein, and be applied in accordance with these Guidelines so that it will present a recognizable visual target that is suitably consistent with railway equipment equipped that is retroreflective sheeting meeting the technical requirements of these Guidelines.

 7.6     Sheeting Dimensions and Quantity

          Retroreflective sheeting shall be applied along the length of each freight car and locomotive side. Retroreflective sheeting shall be applied in strips 4 inches wide and 18 or 36 inches long, unless otherwise specified. The amount of retroreflective sheeting to be applied to each car or locomotive is dependent on the length of the freight car or locomotive and the colour of the sheeting. For the purposes of these Guidelines, the length of a freight car or locomotive is measured from end sill to end sill. Each side of a freight car, including each unit of multi-unit cars, and each side of a locomotive must be equipped with at least the minimum amount of retroreflective sheeting specified in Table 2.

Table 2: Retroreflective Surface Area Per Side

Length of Freight Car, Service Car or Locomotive (Ft)

Minimum Area of YELLOW Retroreflective Sheeting Required (Sq Ft)

Equivalent Number of 4 x 18 in. Reflectors

Minimum Area of WHITE Retroreflective Sheeting Required (Sq Ft)

Equivalent Number of 4 x 18 in. Reflectors

Less than 50

3.5

7

4

8

50 to 60

4

8

5

10

60 to 70

4.5

9

5.5

11

70 to 80

5

10

6

12

80 to 90

5.5

11

7

14

90 to 100

6

12

7.5

15

Over 100

½ sq ft for each additional 10 ft of length


½ sq ft for each additional 10 ft of length


 7.7     Location of Retroreflective Sheeting on Railway Equipment

          Retroreflective sheeting applied must be located clear of appurtenances and devices such as ladders and other safety appliances, pipes, or other attachments that may obscure its visibility. Retroreflective sheeting need not be applied to discontinuous surfaces such as bolts, rivets, door hinges, or other irregularly shaped areas that may prevent the sheeting from adhering to the car sides. In addition, retroreflective sheeting need not be applied over existing or required car stencils and markings. If necessary to avoid appurtenances, discontinuous surfaces, or existing or required car markings or stencils, a 4 by 18 inch strip of retroreflective sheeting may be separated into two 4 by 9 inch strips, or a 4 by 36 inch strip may be separated into four 4 by 9 inch strips, and applied on either side of the appurtenance, discontinuous surface, or car markings or stencils.

 

8.       Application of Retroreflective Sheeting

8.1     Freight cars

          On freight cars, retroreflective sheeting shall be applied in either a vertical or horizontal pattern along the length of the car sides with its bottom edge as close as practicable to 42 inches above the top of the rail. The application of the retroreflective material must be in accordance with AAR Standard S-910 and Rule 66 of the AAR Field Manual. Sheeting shall not be applied below the side sill.

8.2     Locomotives

          Locomotives shall be equipped with at least the minimum amounts of retroreflective sheeting required by Table 2 of these Guidelines. Sheeting is to be spaced as uniformly as practicable along the length of the locomotive sides as close as practicable to 42 inches above top of rail.

 

8.3     Existing freight cars with retroreflective sheeting

          Freight cars previously equipped, with at least one square foot of retroreflective sheeting, uniformly distributed over the length of each side shall be considered to be in compliance until seven years after the effective date of these Guidelines.

 8.4     Existing locomotives with retroreflective sheeting

          Locomotives previously equipped, with at least one square foot of retroreflective sheeting, uniformly distributed over the length of each side shall be considered to be in compliance until four years after the effective date of these Guidelines.

9.       Inspection and Replacement

9.1     Freight Cars

          Retroreflective sheeting on freight cars must be visually inspected for presence and condition whenever a car undergoes a single car air brake test. If at the time of inspection, or at any other time a designated railway company employee determines that more than 20 percent of the minimum amount of sheeting required on either side of a car is damaged, obscured or missing, the railway company shall promptly notify the Canadian car owner of the damaged or missing material. That sheeting shall be repaired or replaced within nine (9) months.

9.2     Locomotives

          Retroreflective sheeting must be visually inspected for presence and condition at least once every twelve months. If more than 20 percent of the minimum amount of sheeting required on either side of a locomotive is damaged, obscured, or missing, that damaged, obscured, or missing sheeting must be repaired or replaced.

          If conditions at the time of inspection are such that replacement material cannot be applied, such application must be completed not later than when the identified equipment is taken out of service for repairs or other maintenance.

10. Renewal

10.1   Retroreflective material must be renewed within 10 years of its original application. For cars and locomotives with existing retroreflective sheeting meeting the requirements of these Guidelines, the renewal date must precede November 29, 2015.

Railway Safety Advisory: Railway Employee Fatality in Windsor Ontario

Advisory No. R2015-3-09
Date of Issue: March 9, 2015

Topic

The following advisory is to inform provincially regulated railways of a railway related safety concern.

On February 27, 2015 an industrial railway conductor was killed on the job when he was struck by railway equipment.

The company was using a tractor to move railway equipment, the tractor operator stepped between the tractor and the railway equipment and was caught in the pinch points.

Compliance

In the performance of railway operations, rules and safe work procedures must be followed. All provincial railways should take a moment to review their own safety procedures.

The United Transportation Union (http://utu.org/switching-operations-fatality-analysis) recommends the following practices.

 

Recommendation 

Any crew member intending to foul track or equipment must notify the locomotive engineer or equipment moving operator before such action can take place. The engineer or operator must then apply locomotive or train brakes, have the reverser centered or another means to disengage propulsion, and then confirm this action with the individual on the ground.

Additionally, any crew member that intends to adjust knuckles/drawbars, or apply or remove EOT device, must insure that the cut of cars to be coupled into is separated by no less than 50 feet. Also, the person on the ground must physically inspect the cut of cars not attached to the locomotive to insure that they are completely stopped and, if necessary, a sufficient number of hand brakes must be applied to insure the cut of cars will not move.

Discussion

This recommendation emphasizes the importance of securing the equipment. A thorough understanding by all crew members that the area between cars is a hazardous location, whether equipment is moving or standing is imperative.

Additional Information

In an effort to reduce injuries and fatalities, the Switching Operations Fatalities Analysis (SOFA) working group recommends railway workers practice the following:

  1. Secure all equipment before action is taken.
  2. Protect employees against moving equipment.
  3. Discuss safety at the beginning of a job or when work changes.
  4. Communicate before action is taken.
  5. Mentor less experienced employees to perform service safely.

For additional information please contact the BCSA Railway Safety Program administration at 778‐396‐2044 or email at bcsa.railway@safetyauthority.ca

Download printable version

Railway Online Forum - Heritage Railways

25 February 2015 - 1:00pm - 2:30pm

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Email: erin.cardona@safetyauthority.ca

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Railway 2014 Statistics

This webpage was updated: Sep 24 2014

The following charts and statistics provide details to railway safety activity in the province and identify accidents and incidents and compliance to regulation for 2014.

BC Railways in Operation
BC Railways Accident & Incident Data
BC Railways Injury Data
BC Railways Audit & Audit Recommendations
BC Railways Assessments, Non-Compliances & Assessment Recommendations
BC Railways Enforcement
BC Railways As Found Conditions

British Columbia Railways (in Operation)

Click to enlarge

Note: Covers Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 for all years.


British Columbia Railways Accident & Incident Data

Railways accident and incidents by railway class 2010 2014 Click to enlarge

Note:
Covers Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 for all years.
Does not include non-railway related Accident & Incidents on Commuter Railways.
Industrial & Industrial Sidings and Spurs are reported as a single group


British Columbia Railways Injury Data

Reported Railway Injuries 2010-2014 Click to enlarge

Note: Covers Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 for all years.

 


British Columbia Railways Audits & Audit Recommendations

Railway Audits and Recommendations 2010-2014 Click to enlarge

Note: Covers Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 for all years.


British Columbia Railways Assessments, Non-Compliances & Assessment Recommendations

Railways Assessments, Non-Compliances & Assessment Recommendations Click to enlarge

Note: Covers Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 for all years.

 


British Columbia Railways Enforcement

Railway Enforcements 2010-2014 Click to enlarge

Note: Covers Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 for all years.


As Found Conditions

As Found Conditions 2010-2014 Click to enlarge

Note: Covers Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 for all years.

Online Railway Town Hall Meeting, Fall 2014

10 November 2014 - 1:00pm - 3:00pm

Contact information:
Email: erin.cardona@safetyauthority.ca

Maximum capacity: 25
# of guests allowed per registration: 0

How to RSVP: Registration Closed

Details

Training Resources

Please login to see the supporting documents. Documents in this section are only available to users registered for this event.

Railway 2014 Statistics

This webpage was updated: Sep 24 2014

The following charts and statistics provide details to railway safety activity in the province and identify accidents and incidents and compliance to regulation for 2014.

BC Railways in Operation
BC Railways Accident & Incident Data
BC Railways Injury Data
BC Railways Audit & Audit Recommendations
BC Railways Assessments, Non-Compliances & Assessment Recommendations
BC Railways Enforcement
BC Railways As Found Conditions

British Columbia Railways (in Operation)

Click to enlarge

Note: Covers Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 for all years.


British Columbia Railways Accident & Incident Data

Railways accident and incidents by railway class 2010 2014 Click to enlarge

Note:
Covers Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 for all years.
Does not include non-railway related Accident & Incidents on Commuter Railways.
Industrial & Industrial Sidings and Spurs are reported as a single group


British Columbia Railways Injury Data

Reported Railway Injuries 2010-2014 Click to enlarge

Note: Covers Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 for all years.

 


British Columbia Railways Audits & Audit Recommendations

Railway Audits and Recommendations 2010-2014 Click to enlarge

Note: Covers Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 for all years.


British Columbia Railways Assessments, Non-Compliances & Assessment Recommendations

Railways Assessments, Non-Compliances & Assessment Recommendations Click to enlarge

Note: Covers Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 for all years.

 


British Columbia Railways Enforcement

Railway Enforcements 2010-2014 Click to enlarge

Note: Covers Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 for all years.


As Found Conditions

As Found Conditions 2010-2014 Click to enlarge

Note: Covers Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 for all years.

Railway Townhall 2012

Safety issues and polices that affect railway operations are discussed through regional meetings and other processes.

2012 Townhall Meeting: Audit Presentation
2012 Townhall Meeting: Practical Approach to Risk Management
2012 Townhall Meeting Notes