Railways

Railway Freight Car Inspection and Safety Guidelines for British Columbia Provincial Heritage Railways

December 9, 2014

PART I – GENERAL  

1.         SHORT TITLE  

1.1 For ease of references, these Guidelines may be referred to as the “Freight Car Safety Guidelines”.

2.         SCOPE  

2.1       These Guidelines prescribe the minimum safety standards for freight cars operated by railway companies subject to the jurisdiction of the MOTI pursuant to the Railway Act (BC).

3.         DEFINITIONS  

In these Guidelines,

3.1       “bad order” means a freight car that has been identified with a defect;

3.2       “bad order card” or “home shop card” means a railway company form that may be affixed to a freight car to indicate maintenance requirements and/or a defect

identified during a safety inspection;

3.3       “bad order information system” means any method a railway company records, controls and protects the movement of a freight car with a defect; 

3.4       “block of cars” means one (1) or more cars that have received a safety inspection or a pre-departure inspection as a solid coupled block for which an inspection record

is available;

3.5        “break” or “broken” means a fracture resulting in complete separation into parts; 

3.8       “cracked” means fractured without complete separation into parts;

3.9       “defect” means any item that is defective on a freight car as indicated by “safety defect” of these Guidelines and Railway Freight and Passenger Train

Brake Inspection and Safety Guidelines

3.11     “freight car” means a car designed to carry freight on rail and includes a caboose and a service equipment car;

3.13.1  “MOTI” means the provincial Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure;

3.14             “person in charge” means a person appointed by a railway company to ensure the safe conduct of an operation or of the work of employees;

3.15             “qualified person” means a person who because of his/her knowledge, training and experience is qualified to perform a pre-departure inspection in accordance with subsection 5.1 of these Guidelines;

3.16             “railway company” means a railway or railway company subject to the Railway Safety Act;

3.17             “railway safety inspector” means a MOTI inspector designated pursuant to section  4 (1) of the Railway Safety Act(BC);

3.19     “safety defect” means any item that is defective on a freight car as prescribed by

Railway Safety Appliance Standards Regulations Guidelines, or the latest edition of AAR Safety Standard S-2044 “Safety Appliance Requirements for Freight Cars” of

the Manual of Standards and Recommended Practices.

 

4.         SAFETY INSPECTIONS  

4.1       Subject to these Guidelines, a railway company shall ensure the freight cars it places or continues in service are free from all safety defects and that such cars comply with Railway Safety Appliance Standards Regulations Guidelines or the latest edition of AAR Safety Standard S-2044 “Safety Appliance Requirements for Freight Cars” of the Manual of Standards and Recommended Practices.

4.2       Safety inspections shall be performed:

(a)        where trains are made up; 

(b)        on cars added to trains;

(c)        where cars are interchanged.  

Such inspections may occur before or after a car is placed in a train at that location.

4.  6      A railway car identified with a safety defect may be moved to another location for repair, in accordance with company procedures, including placing a loaded car for unloading when authorized by a person in charge, who shall ensure that:

(a)                the car is safe to move;

(b)               a means to protect the car’s safe movement is implemented, including identifying for the employees involved the nature of the defect(s) and the movement restrictions, if any; 

(c)                an empty car shall not be loaded until repaired; and

(d)               the appropriate records will be retained for a period of ninety (90) days.

4.7              A car may also be moved when authorized by a person in charge provided the conditions of item 4.6 (a), (b), (c), (d) are adhered to.      

 

5.         PRE-DEPARTURE INSPECTION  

5.1       A pre-departure inspection of the train or the cars added shall be performed by a qualified person, as a minimum, for those conditions listed in Appendix 1 of these Guidelines.

5.2          Pre-departure inspections shall be performed on both sides of equipment.

5.5       All noted hazardous conditions shall be reported for correction in accordance with company procedures.

 

6.         CERTIFICATION AND QUALIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES  

6.2       A railway company shall ensure that its qualified persons are trained and qualified to perform pre-departure inspections of freight cars in compliance with these Guidelines.

             

7.        ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR DANGEROUS GOODS CARS  

7.1       Additional inspections of cars carrying goods subject to the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, latest revision, are required as follows:

(a)               tank cars destined for loading with a dangerous good or other cars destined for loading of explosives shall be given a safety inspection prior to being placed for loading;     

(b)               freight cars loaded with a dangerous good shall be given an inspection by employees of the receiving railway, at the point of loading, for those conditions listed in Appendix 1 of these Guidelines.

 

8.         CORRECTIVE ACTION REPORTING  

8.1       Every railway company shall respond in writing or by acceptable electronic means, within fourteen (14) days, to the BCSA on the corrective action taken to correct non-compliance reported by a Railway Safety Inspector.  The railway company’s response shall include the corrective action taken, the location, date and car number.

APPENDIX 1  

PRE-DEPARTURE INSPECTION  

Freight cars shall, as a minimum, be inspected for these hazardous conditions:

  1. car body related hazards:

(a)                car body leaning or listing to the side;

(b)               car body sagging downward;

(c)                car body positioned improperly on the truck;

(d)               object dragging below the car body;

(e)                object extending from the side of the car body;

(f)                door insecurely attached;

(g)               broken or missing safety appliance; and

(h)               lading leaking from a placarded dangerous goods car;

  1. overheated wheel; 
  2. broken or cracked wheel;
  3. hand brake that failed to release; and
  4. any other apparent safety hazard likely to cause an accident or casualty before the car arrives at its destination.

Canadian Rail Operating Rules - Guidelines for British Columbia Provincial Heritage Railways

October 14, 2015

Canadian Rail Operating Rules

GENERAL NOTICE

Safety and a willingness to obey the rules are of the first importance in the performance of duty.

If in doubt, the safe course must be taken.

DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these rules and special instructions, the following definitions apply:

CROSSOVER
A track joining adjacent main tracks, or a main track and another track.

ENGINE
A locomotive(s) operated from a single control or a cab control car, used in train, transfer or yard service.

ENGINE IN YARD SERVICE
An engine with or without cars utilized exclusively in switching, marshalling, humping, trimming and industrial switching.

EQUIPMENT
One or more engines and/or cars which can be handled on their own wheels in a movement.

FIXED SIGNAL
A signal or sign at a fixed location indicating a condition affecting the operation of a movement.

METHOD OF CONTROL
Rules and/or special instructions governing the use of a track(s).

MOVEMENT(S)
The term used in these rules to indicate that the rule is applicable to trains, transfers or engines in yard service.

NON-MAIN TRACK (NMT)
Any track(s) other than those listed in time table columns as having CTC, OCS, ABS or Cautionary Limits applicable and unless otherwise provided include a requirement to operate at REDUCED speed.

OCCUPATIONAL TERMS:

Assistant Conductor
An employee working under the supervision of a conductor. May also be referred to as trainman or yardman.

Conductor
An employee in charge of the operation of a movement.

Employee
A person qualified to regulatory and company standards employed by the company. Applies to contract employees and employees of other companies and railways operating and/or performing other rules related duties on the host railway trackage.

Foreman
An employee in charge of the protection of track work and track units.

Locomotive Engineer
An employee in control of the engine.

Pilot
An employee assigned to a movement when the locomotive engineer or conductor, or both, are not fully acquainted with the physical characteristics or rules of the railway over which the movement is to be operated.

Proper Authority
The appropriate railway supervisor.

Sub-foreman
A rules qualified employee that works under the protection held by a foreman.

Switchtender
An employee that handles switches for other employees.

Utility Employee
An employee who can be used as a temporary crew member or perform other assigned duties.

SIDING
A track adjacent and connected to the main track which is so designated in the time table, GBO or operating bulletin.

SWITCHES:

Non-Main Track Hand Operated Switch
A switch used to route equipment or a track unit within non-main track territory.


    Normal Position         Reverse Position

 Non-Main Track Hand Operated Switch

Green switch targets are displayed when the non-main track switch is in normal position. Yellow coloured switch targets are displayed when the non-main track is in the reversed position. Switch targets may be any shape, but must not be diamond shape.

Note: Switch targets may be different shapes than illustrated but must not be diamond shape.

Semi-Automatic Switch
A non-main track switch equipped with an internal securing mechanism that permits equipment to trail through the switch points thus setting the switch for the route being used.

                  
Set for Normal Route         Set for Other Than Normal Route

Semi-Automatic Switch

Green, diamond shaped switch targets are displayed when the semi-automatic switch is lined for the normal position. Yellow, diamond shaped targets are displayed when the semi-automatic switch is lined for the reversed position.

Note: Switch targets must be diamond shaped.

Spring Switch
A switch equipped with a spring mechanism arranged to restore the switch points to normal position after having been trailed through.

Switch
A device used to route equipment or a track unit from one track to another.

SPEEDS:

REDUCED Speed
A speed that will permit stopping within one-half the range of vision of equipment.

RESTRICTED Speed
A speed that will permit stopping within one-half the range of vision of equipment, also prepared to stop short of a switch not properly lined and in no case exceeding SLOW speed.

When moving at RESTRICTED speed, be on the lookout for broken rails.

When a broken rail is detected, the movement must be stopped immediately and must not resume until permission is received from the proper authority.

SLOW Speed
A speed not exceeding 15 miles per hour.

TURNOUT Speed
Unless otherwise provided by signal indication or special instructions, a speed not exceeding 15 MPH.

TRACK UNIT (TU)
A vehicle or machine capable of on-track operation utilized for track inspection, track work and other railway activities when on a track.

TRACK UNIT SPEED
A speed that;

(a) permits a track unit to stop within one-half the range of vision of equipment or a track unit;

(b) permits a track unit to stop short of a switch not properly lined or any obstruction or track defect that may prevent safe passage; and

(c) does not exceed maximum authorized speed for that track unit.

TRACK WORK
Any work on or near the track that may render the track unsafe for movements at normal speed or where protection against movements may be required for employees and machines involved in track construction and repairs.

TRAILING END
The tail end of the last piece of equipment in a movement in the direction of travel.

UNATTENDED
When an employee is not in close enough proximity to take effective action.

YARD
A system of non-main tracks, utilized to switch equipment and for other purposes over which movements may operate subject to prescribed signals, rules and special instructions.

GENERAL RULES

A Every employee in any service connected with movements shall;

(i) be subject to and conversant with applicable CROR rules, special instructions and general operating instructions;

(ii) have a copy of this rule book, the general operating instructions and other documents specified by the company accessible while on duty;

(iii) provide every possible assistance to ensure every rule, special instruction and general operating instruction is complied with and shall report promptly to the proper authority any violations thereof;

(iv) communicate by the quickest available means to the proper authority any condition which may affect the safe operation of a movement and be alert to the company’s interest and join forces to protect it;

(v) obtain assistance promptly when it is required to control a harmful or dangerous condition;

(vi) be conversant with and governed by every safety rule and instruction of the company pertaining to their occupation;

(vii) pass the required examination at prescribed intervals, not to exceed three years, and carry while on duty, a valid certificate of rules qualification;

(viii) seek clarification from the proper authority if in doubt as to the meaning of any rule or instruction;

(ix) conduct themselves in a courteous and orderly manner;

(x) when reporting for duty, be fit, rested and familiar with their duties and the territory over which they operate;

(xi) while on duty, not engage in non-railway activities which may in any way distract their attention from the full performance of their duties. Except as provided for in company policies, sleeping or assuming the position of sleeping is prohibited. The use of personal entertainment devices is prohibited. Printed material not connected with the operation of movements or required in the performance of duty, must not be openly displayed or left in the operating cab of a locomotive or track unit or at any work place location utilized in train, transfer or engine control; and

(xii) restrict the use of communication devices to matters pertaining to railway operations. Cellular telephones must not be used when normal railway radio communications are available. When cellular telephones are used in lieu of radio all applicable radio rules must be complied with.

B Special Instructions will be found in general operating instructions, or operating bulletins. They may be appended to or included within copies of the Canadian Rail Operating Rules but do not diminish the intent of the rule unless official exemption has been granted.

C Employees must:

(i) be vigilant to avoid the risk of injury to themselves or others;

(ii) expect a movement, track unit or equipment to move at any time, on any track, in either direction;

(iii) not stand in front of approaching equipment for the purpose of entraining;

(iv) not ride the side or above the roof of moving equipment when passing side and/or overhead restrictions;

(v) not be on the roof of moving equipment, or on the lading of a moving open top car;

(vi) not be on the end of a car while in motion except for the purpose of operating a hand brake; and

(vii) not ride on any car known or suspected to contain a shifted load or damaged such that its structure or components may not be secure, or any car trailing such car.

D Each employee must be acquainted with, and be on the lookout for, restricted side and overhead clearances. Where standard restricted clearance signs are used, no other advice of restricted clearance will elsewhere or otherwise be given. If such signs are not provided in a yard or terminal, the location of the restricted clearance will be shown in special instructions.

E Overhead and side clearance may be restricted on a track at a main shop, diesel shop or car shop. Where restricted clearance exists on such track, it will not be marked by a standard restricted clearance sign nor will its location be elsewhere or otherwise given.

F Employees must not ride on top or side of equipment when on any main shop, diesel shop or car shop track, whether or not the overhead and side clearance is restricted.

G                     (i) The use of intoxicants or narcotics by employees subject to duty, or their possession or use while on duty, is prohibited.

(ii) The use of mood altering agents by employees subject to duty, or their possession or use while on duty, is prohibited except as prescribed by a doctor.

(iii) The use of drugs, medication or mood altering agents, including those prescribed by a doctor, which, in any way, will adversely affect their ability to work safely, by employees subject to duty, or on duty, is prohibited.

(iv) Employees must know and understand the possible effects of drugs, medication or mood altering agents, including those prescribed by a doctor, which, in any way, will adversely affect their ability to work safely.

L Wherever the following occupational names or titles appear in these rules, special instructions, or general operating instructions, they apply to the employee, who is qualified and is responsible for performing the duties of:

conductor,
assistant conductor,
flagman,
foreman,
locomotive engineer,
pilot,
sub-foreman,
switchtender.

M Wherever the following: engine, train, transfer or movement appear in these rules, special instructions or general operating instructions, the necessary action will be carried out by a crew member or crew members of the movement. In addition:

(i) Where only one crew member is employed, operating rules and instructions requiring joint compliance may be carried out by either the locomotive engineer or conductor, and

(ii) In the absence of a locomotive engineer on a crew consisting of at least two members, the conductor will designate another qualified employee to perform the rules required duties of the locomotive engineer.

N The following abbreviations and acronyms as well as those authorized by special instructions may be used:

ack - Acknowledgement

cndr - Conductor

eng - Engine

engr - Locomotive engineer

exp - Express

frmn - Foreman

frt - Freight

MPH - Miles per hour

NA - Not Applicable

no - Number

swt - Switch

trk - Track

trnm - Trainman

TU - Track Unit

xover - Crossover

xing - Crossing

O In these rules when the distance prescribed for the placement of signals, signs or flags is not possible due to track configuration, the maximum distance available applies. If the maximum distance available will place an advance flag at the same location as the flag it governs the approach to, such advance flag need not be placed but such must be indicated in the GBO.

TIME AND TIME TABLES

SIGNALS - GENERAL

11. Fusees

(a) A movement approaching a red fusee burning on or near its track, or beyond the nearest rail of an adjacent track, must proceed at REDUCED speed.

(b) A fusee should not be placed on a public crossing at grade or where it may cause fire.

(c) OPTIONAL
When the fusee is located on the track occupied by an approaching movement operating at REDUCED or RESTRICTED speed as required by other than Rule 11, a stop must be made before passing the location of the fusee.

12. Hand Signals

(a) Employees whose duties may require them to give hand signals must have the proper appliances, keep them in good order and ready for immediate use. Night signals must be used from sunset to sunrise and when day signals cannot be plainly seen.

Note: The hand or a flag displayed in the same manner as the lantern, which is illustrated in the following diagrams, gives the same indication.

 

Method of Display and Indication

(i) Swung from side to side at right angle to the track.

STOP

Employee is depicted swinging a hand lantern from side to side at right angle to the track. Note: The employees hand or a flag displayed in the same manner as the lantern, gives the same indication.

(ii) Swung in a circle at right angle to the track at a speed in proportion to the speed required.

MOVE BACKWARD

Employee is depicted swinging a hand lantern in a circle at right angle to the track at a speed in proportion to the speed required. Note: The employees hand or a flag displayed in the same manner as the lantern, gives the same indication.

(iii) Raised and lowered at a speed in proportion to the speed required.

MOVE FORWARD

Employee is depicted raising and lowering a hand lantern at a speed in proportion to the speed required. Note: The employees hand or a flag displayed in the same manner as the lantern, gives the same indication.

(iv) Raised and swung horizontally above the head, at right angle to the track when standing.

APPLY AIR BRAKES

Employee is depicted with the hand lantern raised and swung horizontally above the head, at right angle to the track when standing. Note: The employees hand or a flag displayed in the same manner as the lantern, gives the same indication.

(v) Raised and held at arm's length above the head when standing.

RELEASE AIR BRAKES

Employee is depicted with the hand lantern raised and held at arm's length above the head when standing. Note: The employees hand or a flag displayed in the same manner as the lantern, gives the same indication.

(vi) Held horizontally at arm's length.

REDUCE SPEED

Employee is depicted with the hand lantern held horizontally at arm's length. Note: The employees hand or flag displayed in the same manner as the lantern, gives the same indication.

(vii) Any object waved violently by anyone on or near the track is a signal to stop.

(b) A signal given to move forward or move backward must be given in relation to the front of the controlling locomotive.

(c) A signal must be given in sufficient time before the required action to permit compliance. It must be given from a point where it can be plainly seen, and in such a manner that it cannot be misunderstood. If there is doubt as to the meaning of a signal, or for whom it is intended, it must be regarded as a stop signal.

(d) Whenever practicable, when switching is being performed, required signals shall be given directly to the locomotive engineer.

(e) When moving under the control of hand signals, the disappearance from view of either the crew member or lights by which signals controlling the movement are being given, must be regarded as a stop signal.

(f) A crew member, whose movement is clear of the main track, must not give an approaching movement a hand signal to move forward.

(g) Where radio is used in lieu of hand signals, employees will be governed by Rule 123.1.

13. Engine Bell

(a) The engine bell must be rung when:

(i) an engine is about to move, except when switching requires frequent stopping and starting after the initial move;

(ii) passing any movement standing on an adjacent track;

(iii) approaching, passing or moving about station facilities or shop track areas; and

(iv) one-quarter of a mile from every public crossing at grade (except within limits as may be prescribed in special instructions) until the crossing is fully occupied by the engine or cars. At crossings where engine whistle signal 14(l) is applicable the engine bell need not be rung.

14. Engine Whistle Signals

Note:

(i) Wherever the words “engine whistle” appear in these rules they also refer to “engine horn”. Signals prescribed by this rule are illustrated by “o” for short sounds; “___” for longer sounds.

(ii) Engine whistle signals must be sounded as prescribed by this rule, and should be distinct, with intensity and duration proportionate to the distance the signal is to be conveyed. Unnecessary use of the whistle is prohibited.

(iii) Radio must not be used in lieu of engine whistle signals for indications prefixed by the symbol (#).

(a) o
When standing - braking system is equalized; angle cock may be closed.

(b) o o
Note: Not applicable when switching.

(i) Answer to a “stop” signal (except a fixed signal).

(ii) Answer to any signal not otherwise provided for.

 (f) Succession of short sounds
(#) Alarm for persons or animals on or near the track.

(l) ___ ___ o ___

(i) (#) At public crossings at grade:
A whistle post will be located 1/4 mile before each public crossing where required. Whistle signal must be sounded by movements:

  •  
    • exceeding 44 MPH, at the whistle post
    • operating at 44 MPH or less, in order to provide 20 seconds warning prior to entering the crossing.

Whistle signal must be prolonged or repeated until the crossing is fully occupied.

EXCEPTION: Not applicable when manual protection is to be provided or when shoving equipment other than a snow plow over a crossing protected by automatic warning devices.

(ii) (#) At other whistle posts indicated in special instructions.

(iii) (#) At frequent intervals when view is restricted by weather, curvature or other conditions.

(iv) Special instructions will govern when such signal is prohibited in whole or in part.

(r) In case of engine whistle failure the engine bell must be rung continuously;

17. Headlight

Movements headed by equipment equipped with a headlight must display the headlight:

(a) at full power in the direction of travel approaching all public crossings at grade until such crossings are fully occupied;

 (c) on both ends of the engine while moving on non-main track but may be extinguished on the end coupled to cars.

EXCEPTIONS: When not approaching a public crossing at grade the headlight may be extinguished or dimmed:

(i) approaching or being approached by an opposing movement;

(ii) on a passenger carrying train, approaching a location where passengers will entrain or detrain;

(iii) facing oncoming vehicles at night which may be affected on adjacent roadways; or

(iv) when weather conditions cause the vision of the operating crew to be impaired.

18. Headlight Failure

(a) If the headlight on a movement fails and repairs cannot be made, ditch lights will be used in lieu of the headlight and the movement may proceed.

(b) If all headlights and ditch lights have failed, such lights as are available must be used proceeding to the first point where repairs can be made. At public and private crossings at grade not protected by automatic warning devices, movements must not exceed 10 MPH entering the crossing unless it is known to be clear of traffic and will remain clear until occupied.

19. Ditch Lights

A train must have ditch lights displayed continuously in the direction of travel when the headlight is required to be displayed full power.

If ditch light(s) fail enroute, the movement may proceed to the next point where repairs can be made.

26. Blue Signal Protection

(a) A blue flag by day, and in addition a blue light by night or when day signals cannot be plainly seen, displayed at one or both ends of equipment indicates that workmen are in the vicinity of such equipment. On a track which permits entry of a movement from one end only, a blue signal displayed between the equipment and the switch permitting entry indicates that workmen are in the vicinity of such equipment. When such signals are displayed the equipment must not be coupled to or moved. The removal of the signal from one or both ends of equipment indicates that no workmen are in the vicinity of the equipment and such equipment may be coupled to or moved.

EXCEPTION: When repairs must be undertaken on a manned movement, the locomotive engineer must be notified before repair work is commenced. When so notified, the movement must not be moved nor the brakes applied or released until the workmen have advised that they are in the clear.

(b) Other equipment must not be placed on the same track which will block a clear view of the blue signal(s) without first notifying the workmen. When equipment is placed on the same track, the movement placing such equipment must remain on that track until the workmen have relocated the blue signal(s) to include the additional equipment.

(c) Each class of workmen will display the blue signal(s) and the same class of workmen only are authorized to remove them.

(d) Special instructions will govern the use of other approved methods of protecting workmen performing equipment repairs or inspections.

27. Signal Imperfectly Displayed

(a) A fixed signal which is imperfectly displayed, or the absence of a fixed signal where one is usually displayed, must be regarded as the most restrictive indication that such signal is capable of displaying. An imperfectly displayed signal must be communicated to the proper authority as soon as possible.

 (c) When a signal is known or suspected of being damaged, it must be regarded as displaying the most restrictive indication that can be given by that signal.

 (e) Repairs to damaged signals must not be made by other than qualified employees. Signals that have been knocked over must not be re-erected by other than an authorized employee.

33. Speed Compliance

If speed requirements for their movement are exceeded, crew members must remind one another of such requirements. If no action is then taken, or if the locomotive engineer is observed to be non-responsive or incapacitated, other crew members must take immediate action to ensure the safety of the movement, including stopping it in emergency if required.

34. Fixed Signal Recognition and Compliance

(a) The crew on the controlling engine of any movement and snow plow foremen must know the indication of each fixed signal (including switches where practicable) before passing it.

(b) Crew members within physical hearing range must communicate to each other, in a clear and audible manner, the indication by name, of each fixed signal they are required to identify. Each signal affecting their movement must be called out as soon as it is positively identified, but crew members must watch for and promptly communicate and act on any change of indication which may occur.

The following signals/operating signs must be communicated:

 (v) Stop sign;

(vii) Red signal between the rails;

(viii) Stop signal displayed by a flagman;

(ix) A switch not properly lined for the movement affected;

 (c) If prompt action is not taken to comply with the requirements of each signal indication affecting their movement, crew members must remind one another of such requirements. If no action is then taken, or if the locomotive engineer is observed to be incapacitated, other crew members must take immediate action to ensure the safety of the movement, including stopping it in emergency if required.

35. Emergency Protection

This rule does not authorize track work.

(a) Any employee discovering a hazardous condition, which may affect the safe passage of a movement, must by the use of flags, lights, fusees, radio, telephone, or other means, make every possible effort to stop and/or provide necessary instructions to any movement that may be affected.

PROTECTION OF TRACK WORK AND TRACK CONDITIONS

41. Protection of Track Work on Non-Main Track and in Cautionary Limits

This rule is not applicable on main tracks outside of cautionary limits, signalled sidings and other signalled tracks, or on other tracks specified in special instructions.

(i) A movement required to operate on a track protected by a red signal between the rails or a switch locked with a special lock must be stopped before passing it and be governed by any instructions from the foreman.

(ii) Only the foreman or an employee authorized by the foreman may remove the red signal and/or special lock.

(iii) Equipment must not be left on the same track that will block a clear view of any red signal.

Note: Foreman must refer to Rule 841

The switch is lined away from the working point and locked with a special lock. - A red flag is placed between the rails in each direction at least 100 yards from the working point, where there will be a clear view of them from an approaching movement of 300 yards if possible.

 

OPERATION OF MOVEMENTS

62. Unattended Engines

When an engine is left unattended outside of an attended yard or terminal:

(a) the cab of the engine must be secured to prevent unauthorized entry; and

(b) subject to (c), the reverser must be removed from the engine;

(c) during subzero temperatures, an engine that does not have a high idle feature is exempt from (b).

80. Main Track Authorization

(a) A movement must not foul or enter a main track without authority.

101. Protection Against Extraordinary Conditions

(a) A movement must be fully protected against any known or suspected condition that may interfere with its safe passage.

(b) A movement must stop at once and be fully inspected when it is known or suspected to have struck any object that may interfere with its safe operation.

103. Public Crossings at Grade

(a) Where a railway track and a public road share the same roadbed and there is no fence or other barrier between them, moving rail cars not headed by an engine or when headed by a remotely controlled engine must be protected by a crew member on the leading car or on the ground, in a position to warn persons standing on, or crossing, or about to cross the track.

(b) When required by special instruction or when cars not headed by an engine, snow plow or other equipment equipped with a whistle and headlight, are moving over a public crossing at grade, a crew member must provide manual protection of the crossing until the crossing is fully occupied.

EXCEPTION: Manual protection of the crossing is not required provided the crossing is equipped with automatic warning devices and a crew member is on the leading car to warn persons standing on, or crossing, or about to cross the track. This exception does not modify the application of Rule 103.1 (a).

(c) Crew members must not give vehicular traffic a hand signal to proceed over a crossing.

(d) No part of a movement may be allowed to stand on any part of a public crossing at grade, for a longer period than 5 minutes, when vehicular or pedestrian traffic requires passage. Switching operations at such crossing must not obstruct vehicular or pedestrian traffic for a longer period than 5 minutes at a time. When emergency vehicles require passage, employees must cooperate to quickly clear the involved crossings.

(e) Equipment must not be left standing within 100 feet of the travelled portion of a public or private crossing at grade, except where it is necessary to leave such equipment for loading or unloading.

(f) Before switching or operating a remote control locomotive over an unprotected public crossing at grade where the view of the crossing by the locomotive engineer is obscured, arrangements must be made for a crew member or other employee to be in position to observe the crossing and give signals and instructions to the locomotive engineer as necessary.

 (g) When providing manual protection of a crossing, a crew member or other qualified employee must be on the ground ahead of the movement, in a position to stop vehicular and pedestrian traffic before entering the crossing. A hand signal by day and a light or a lighted fusee by night will be used to give a signal to stop vehicular and pedestrian traffic over such crossing. The movement must not enter the crossing until a signal to enter the crossing has been received from the employee providing the manual protection.

When the crossing is known to be clear of traffic, and will remain clear until occupied, manual protection need not be provided.

103.1 Public Crossings at Grade with warning devices

(a) When a movement passes over any public crossing at grade equipped with automatic warning devices, it will be necessary, before reversing over the crossing, for a crew member to provide manual protection of the crossing.

 (c) A movement on non-main track over a public crossing at grade, equipped with automatic warning devices, must not exceed 10 miles per hour from a distance of 300 feet until the crossing is fully occupied.

(d) At a public crossing at grade where special instructions require that warning devices be operated by pushbutton, or other appliances, or that movements stop at stop signs, movements affected must not occupy the crossing until the warning devices have been operating for at least 20 seconds. Pushbutton boxes must be closed and locked when not in use.

(e) Equipment must not be allowed to stand so as to cause the unnecessary operation of warning devices.

(f) When advised by special instructions that rusty rail or other conditions may exist, occupancy of crossings with automatic warning devices must be manually protected unless it is known that warning devices have been operating for at least 20 seconds.

(g) At crossings equipped with automatic warning devices indicated in special instructions, movements must not accelerate by more than 5 MPH unless automatic warning devices are known to have been operating for at least 20 seconds.

(h) Employees observing the improper operation of any automatic warning device must notify the person responsible for the territory by the quickest available means. The person notified must immediately notify those charged with repair and/or responsibility.

 (ii) The person responsible for the territory must instruct all affected movements to apply Rule 103(g).

104. Hand Operated Switches

General

(a) Operation of Switches - semi-automatic, spring, dual control or auto-normal switches operated by hand are considered hand operated switches, and all rules governing hand operated switches apply.

(b) Except while being turned, each switch must be secured with an approved device. When a switch has been turned, the points must be examined and the target, reflector or light, if any, observed to ensure that the switch is properly lined for the route to be used.

(c) A switch must not be turned while any part of a car or engine is between the switch points and the fouling point of the track to be used, except when making a running switch or in the application of the exception to Rule 114.

 (e) If it is known or suspected that either of the points or any part of a switch is damaged or broken, the switch must be protected until it can be made safe for use.

(f) When a switch point lock is provided, it must be locked when the switch is left in normal position. Employees must familiarize themselves with the location of switch point locks.

Hand Operated Non-Main Track Switches

(o) Non-main track switches, when equipped with a lock, must be lined in normal position and locked after having been used.

104.1 Spring Switches

(a) A spring switch will be identified by a spring switch sign bearing the letters “SS”.

(b) Employees must keep clear of the switch handle while it is being lifted or released.

(c) When trailing through a spring switch, a movement that stops must not be reversed, nor slack taken, until the switch has been properly set by hand.

(d) When ice or snow conditions warrant, all movements must stop before trailing through a spring switch and examine the switch points, cleaning them if necessary.

(e) When a movement is required to operate over a spring switch in the facing point direction at RESTRICTED speed, a stop must be made before the leading wheels are on the switch points, and the switch points must be examined from a position on the ground.

  •  
    •  
      • (i) If the points are found to be properly closed the movement will be governed by the indication of the signal, if any.
      • (ii) If the switch points are not properly closed and cannot be closed by use of the switch handle, the points must be spiked in the proper position and the movement will be governed by the indication of the signal, if any.

After operating over a spiked spring switch, the spike must be removed and the employee in charge notified as quickly as possible.

104.4 Semi-automatic switches

(a) A semi-automatic switch will be equipped with reflectorized targets.

(b) When ice or snow may affect the ability of the switch points on a semi-automatic switch to close properly when operated by wheel flange, a member of the crew must manually line the switch and ensure the points are properly lined before a trailing move is commenced over the switch. Movements operating in a facing point direction must observe the position of the points in addition to the target indication before proceeding over a semi-automatic switch.

(c) After coupling to equipment at a semi-automatic switch, or when reversing direction through such switch, a facing point move must not be made, unless one unit of equipment has trailed entirely through the switch, or it is known that the points are properly lined for the movement.

104.5 Derails

(a) The location of each derail will be marked by a sign, unless otherwise directed by special instructions. Employees must be familiar with the location of each derail.

(b) A movement or track unit must stop short of a derail set in the derailing position.

(c) Each derail, other than a Special Derail or a Blue Flag Derail, must be left in the derailing position.

(d) The location of SPECIAL DERAILS will be indicated in the time table or special instructions, will be switch stand operated and identified in the field with a reflective red letter “D” on a reflective yellow target, or a sign indicating “Special Derail” which will be visible when in the derailing position.

The following requirements govern their use:

  •  
    •  
      • they will only be in the derailing position when unattended equipment is present;
      • equipment to be left must be coupled together except when required to clear a crossing or on account of a mechanical defect; and
      • movements required to move at RESTRICTED speed on a track where a SPECIAL DERAIL is located must, in addition to the requirements of RESTRICTED speed, approach such derail prepared to find it in the derailing position.

(e) All derails must be left secured with a locking device.

(f) Derails used in conjunction with blue flags will be in the derailing position only when protection for personnel is required. When protection is no longer required, they will be locked in a non-derailing position.

(g) Where hand operated switch point derails are in use, the points must be examined and the target observed to ensure that the derail is in the proper position.

105. Operation on Non-Main Track

A movement using non-main track must operate at REDUCED speed and be prepared to stop short of the end of track or the red signal prescribed by Rule 41.

(b) Movements operating on non-main tracks must not exceed fifteen (15) MPH.

(c) In addition to moving at REDUCED speed, a movement using non-main tracks must operate at a speed that will allow it to stop within one-half the range of vision of a track unit.

106. Crew Responsibilities

All crew members are responsible for the safe operation of movements and equipment in their charge and for the observance of the rules. Under conditions not provided for by the rules, they must take every precaution for protection.

A utility employee becomes a crew member when working with any movement.

108. Precautions While Switching

When switching is performed, precautions must be taken by crew members to prevent unintended rollbacks and/or fouling of other tracks and equipment.

112. Leaving Equipment Unattended

In the application of this rule:

(i) Equipment is considered unattended when an employee is not in close enough proximity to take effective action to stop the unintentional moving of equipment.

(ii) Physical securement or mechanical devices are:

  •  
    •  
      • hand brakes;
      • air brakes;
      • derails;
      • mechanical emergency devices;
      • locomotive equipped with a reset safety control (RSC) with roll-away protection where air pressure is maintained by continuous operation or auto start is provided;
      • bowled terrain; and
      • if in a yard: retarder, stop-block, wheel chocks and skates.

(iii) High risk locations, as determined by a risk assessment, must be identified in company instructions.

(a) When equipment, including a locomotive without an air source, is left unattended on a main track, subdivision track, siding or high risk location, at least the minimum number of hand brakes as indicated in the hand brake chart in (k) must be applied and determined to be sufficient through an effectiveness test described in (e), and at least one additional physical securement or mechanical device must be used. When air brakes are used as an additional means of physical securement:

(i) the air brake system must be charged to ensure proper brake application; and

(ii) the brake pipe must be fully vented at a service rate or have an emergency application and, on freight equipment, the angle cock left open.

(iii) the equipment may only be left unattended for up to a maximum of two hours.

If required to be left longer, an employee must conduct a visual verification to confirm that the equipment remains secure. The verification must confirm the air brake pistons are fully extended and the hand brakes remain applied. This verification must be carried out at consecutive intervals of two hours or less. If any motion is detected during the verification, additional hand brakes must be applied. The results of that verification must be communicated to another employee.

(b) When unattended equipment is left coupled to a locomotive with an air source on a main track, subdivision track, siding or high risk location, at least the minimum number of hand brakes as indicated in the hand brake chart in (k) must be applied and determined to be sufficient through an effectiveness test described in (e), and at least one additional physical securement or mechanical device must be used. When air brakes are used as an additional means of physical securement:

(i) the locomotive controlling the air brake system must maintain pressure;

(ii) the air brake system must be charged to ensure proper brake application and the equipment must be left with air brakes applied; and

(iii) the independent brake must be fully applied.

(c) When equipment is left unattended in a yard, at least one physical securement or mechanical device must be utilized.

(d) When equipment is left unattended on non-main track, at other than a yard, siding, subdivision track, or high risk location, a sufficient number of hand brakes must be applied and determined sufficient through an effectiveness test described in (e). Special instructions must indicate the minimum hand brake requirements for these locations where equipment is left unattended.

(e) When hand brakes are used, an effectiveness test must be performed as follows: release all air brakes and,

(i) allow or cause the slack to adjust. It must be apparent when slack runs in or out, that the hand brakes are sufficient to prevent the equipment from moving; or

(ii) apply sufficient tractive effort to determine that the hand brakes provide sufficient force to prevent the equipment from moving when tractive effort is terminated.

(f) Hand brakes must be applied on all locomotives in the lead consist of an unattended movement.

(g) Application of hand brakes must not be done while equipment is being pulled or shoved.

(h) Before leaving equipment at any location, the employee securing such equipment must confirm with another employee the manner in which the equipment has been secured.

(i) Exceptional weather situations, such as high winds or other unusual conditions, must be considered and factored into securement decisions. When exceptional weather situations emerge, previously secured equipment may require additional means of securement. Special instructions may contain location specific instructions where extreme weather events are prevalent.

(j) When advised that trespasser(s) or emergency responder(s) have been in contact with unattended equipment, the person responsible for the territory must make arrangements to have an employee verify the equipment remains secured without delay.  

(k) In the application of this chart, the number of hand brakes on locomotives in the lead consist shall not to be included in the number of hand brakes required by the chart.

 

Minimum Required Number of Hand Brakes for Securing Equipment or Movements Left Unattended

Total Tons:

Average Grade is Equal To or Less Than

0.2%

0.4%

0.6%

0.8%

1.0%

1.2%

1.4%

1.6%

1.8%

2.0%

2.2%

2.4%

> 2.4%

0 - 2000

2

2

2

4

6

6

8

10

10

12

12

14

 

> 2000 - 4000

2

2

4

6

8

12

14

16

18

20

22

26

> 4000 - 6000

2

6

6

10

14

16

20

24

28

30

34

38

> 6000 - 8000

4

6

8

12

18

22

26

32

36

42

46

52

> 8000 - 10000

4

6

10

16

22

28

34

40

46

52

58

66

> 10000 - 12000

4

8

12

20

26

34

40

48

56

64

72

80

> 12000 – 14000

6

8

14

22

30

40

48

58

66

76

84

96

> 14000 - 16000

6

10

16

26

36

46

56

66

76

88

98

110

> 16000 - 18000

6

10

18

28

40

50

62

74

86

100

112

126

> 18000 - 20000

8

12

20

32

44

58

70

84

98

112

128

146

> 20000 - 22000

8

12

22

36

50

64

78

94

110

100% Hand Brakes

> 22000 – 24000

8

12

24

38

54

70

86

104

122

> 24000 - 26000

10

14

26

42

58

76

94

112

134

> 26000 - 28000

10

14

28

46

64

82

104

124

148

> 28000 - 30000

12

16

30

50

68

90

110

136

162

> 30000

12

16

34

52

74

96

120

148

172

 

113. Coupling to Equipment

(a) Before coupling to equipment at any point, care must be taken to ensure that such equipment is properly secured.

(b) Unless otherwise specified in special instructions, before coupling to or moving equipment being loaded or unloaded, all persons in or about such equipment must be notified. Vehicles and loading or unloading devices must be clear.

 (d) When coupling to equipment for any purpose except when humping or flat switching where cars are intentionally let run free, the coupling must be stretched to ensure it is secure.

(e) To prevent by-pass couplers when coupling to equipment on other than tangent track, a stop must be made not less than 6 nor greater than 12 feet from the coupling and extreme caution must then be used, ensuring couplers are properly aligned prior to coupling being made.

(f) After coupling, the equipment must be checked for applied hand brakes as may normally be expected to be present.

114. Fouling Other Tracks

(a) Equipment must not be allowed to move foul of another track unless properly protected.

(b) A movement must not foul a track until the switches connected with the move are properly lined, or in the case of semi-automatic or spring switches, the conflicting route is known to be clear.

EXCEPTION: A movement may foul a track connected by a hand operated switch provided that:

(i) neither the track occupied nor the track to be fouled are main tracks;

(ii) the conflicting route is known to be clear; and

(iii) the switch is properly lined before the movement passes over it.

(c) Equipment must not be left foul of a connecting track unless the switch is left lined for the track upon which such equipment is standing.

115. Shoving Equipment

(a) When equipment is shoved by an engine or is headed by an unmanned remotely controlled engine, a crew member must be on the leading piece of equipment or on the ground, in a position to observe the track to be used and to give signals or instructions necessary to control the move.

EXCEPTION: A crew member need not be so positioned when the portion of the track to be used is known to be clear. However, equipment not headed by an engine must not approach to within 100 feet of any public, private or farm crossing unless such crossings are protected as described in Rule 103 paragraph (b) or (g).

(b) Known to be clear is defined as seeing the portion of the track to be used as being clear and remaining clear of equipment and as having sufficient room to contain equipment being shoved. This determination must be made by a qualified employee who can observe the track and has radio contact with the employee controlling the movement. Where a track that has been seen to be clear and no access to that track is possible by another movement, the track may be considered as “known to be clear”.

Note: When it can be determined that other movements are not on duty or will not be performing work in the track to be used, the requirement of “known to be clear” can be considered to be fulfilled continuously.

 (d) Unless the route is known to be clear, when reversing with a locomotive consist and visibility is restricted, a member of the crew must be on the leading end and in position from which signals necessary can be properly given.

116. Running Switch

Before making a running switch, crew members affected must understand the move to be made. It must be known that the switch and hand brakes are in working order before the move is commenced. A running switch must not be made;

(i) with or onto occupied equipment, or equipment placarded to indicate it contains or contained dangerous goods;

(ii) where the switch to be used is a dual control, power-operated or spring switch; or

(iii) within interlocking limits of a drawbridge or railway crossing at grade.

A minimum of 3 qualified employees must be utilized when performing a running switch.

 

RADIO

117. Reliability Tests

The crew of a movement when equipped with radios must carry out an intra-crew test of such radios before leaving their initial terminal, change-off or starting point. When a movement is equipped with a single radio, it must be voice tested as soon as practicable after the crew commences duty.

118. Devices Used in Lieu of Radio

When a communication device is used in lieu of a radio, all radio rules are applicable.

119. Continuous Monitoring

(a) When not being used to transmit or receive a communication, receivers must be set to the appropriate standby channel and at a volume which will ensure continuous monitoring. When required to use another channel to perform other duties, at least one radio, when practicable, should be set to the designated standby channel to receive emergency communications.

120. Radio Terms

(a) In radio communication the following terms when used will denote:

“STAND BY” - Monitor this channel for my next transmission.
“OVER” - Transmission is ended and a response is expected.
“OUT” - Transmission is ended and no response is expected.

(b) OPTIONAL:

Except when radio communication relates to switching operations, when a transmission is complete and a response is expected or required, the transmitting employee must end each transmission with the spoken word “OVER”.

121. Positive Identification

(a) The person initiating a radio communication and the responding party must establish positive identification. The initial call must commence with the railway company initials of the person being called.

In addition, when a non-railway company person is calling on a company’s channels, they must use their company’s name to identify themselves within the initial transmission.

(b) The person initiating the radio communication must end the initial call with the spoken word “OVER.”

(c) Each party to a radio communication must end their final transmission with the spoken word “OUT.”

122. Content of Radio Communications

Radio communications must be brief and to the point and contain only essential instructions or information.

123. Verification Procedures

 (c) when verbal instructions or information affecting the safety of a movement are received by radio, such information must be repeated to the sender.

123.1 Radio or Hand Signals

Before changing between radio or hand signals, a definite understanding as to the method of communication must be established between crew members giving or receiving instructions. In case of an emergency, either method may be used in addition to that previously arranged.

123.2 Switching by Radio

When radio is used to control switching, and after positive identification has been established, the following procedures are required:

(i) direction in relation to the front of the controlling locomotive must be given in the initial instruction and from then on whenever the direction is to change;

(ii) distance to travel must be given with each communication and increments of less than two car lengths need not be repeated;

(iii) when the movement has travelled one-half the distance required by the last instruction and no further communication is received, the movement must stop;

(iv) the indication of block and interlocking signals affecting their movement, must be communicated between crew members while switching;

(v) doubt as to the meaning of an instruction or for whom it is intended must be regarded as a stop signal; and

(vi) when car lengths are used to communicate distance, unless otherwise arranged, the distance referred to is 50 feet per car length.

125. Emergency Communication Procedures

(a) An employee will transmit the word “EMERGENCY” three times at the beginning of the transmission to indicate the report of;

(i) an accident involving injury to employees or others;

(ii) a condition which may constitute a hazard to employees or others;

(iii) a condition which may endanger the passage of movements; or

(iv) a derailment which has occurred on, or is fouling, a main track.

(b) When an emergency communication, which is directed to a specific person or movement, has not been acknowledged, any other employee hearing it will, if practicable, relay the communication by any means available. Other employees must not interfere with such communication.

(c) An emergency communication has absolute priority over other transmissions.

126. Restricted Use of Radio

In addition to the restrictions in Rules 14 radio must not be used to;

 (ii) give information which may influence a crew to consider that speed restrictions are diminished.

Passenger Train Brake Inspection and Safety Rules: Guidelines for British Columbia Provincial Heritage Railways

October 27, 2014

Part I: General

1. Short Title

1.1 For ease of reference, these Guidelines may be referred to as the "Brake Inspection Guidelines".

2. Scope

2.1 These Guidelines prescribe the minimum safety standards for the safe operation of brakes on all equipment operated by a railway subject to the jurisdiction of the MOTI pursuant to the Railway Safety Act(BC).

3. Definitions

In these Guidelines:

3.1 “bad order” means railway equipment that has been identified with a defect.

3.1.1 “BCSA” means British Columbia Safety Authority;

3.2 “bad order card” means a railway form that is affixed to railway equipment to indicate repair or maintenance requirements.

3.3 “bad order information system” means any method by which a railway company can monitor, control and protect the movement of railway equipment identified with defects.

3.4 “block of cars” means two (2) or more cars that have previously received a No.1 or No.1A brake test, as a solid coupled block, for which a record is available.

3.5 “block swap” means the addition to a train of a maximum of two (2) solid coupled block(s) of cars that have previously received a No.1 brake test.

3.6 “brakes” means pneumatic or other systems used to control the movement of railway equipment.

3.7 “brake indicator device” means any device used to indicate the application and release of the brakes when the piston is not visible.

3.8 “brake system defect” means a defective or inoperative brake component that prevents the brake system from functioning as intended.

3.9 “brake test” means a test performed for the purpose of establishing that the brake system functions as intended, as outlined in Part II of these Guidelines and railway company procedures/work instructions.

3.10 “cab control car” means a railway vehicle without propelling motors with one or more control stands.

3.11 “calibrated” means an indication on the airflow indicator at a position that corresponds to a flow of air into the brake pipe of sixty (60) cubic feet (one point seven (1.7) cubic metres) per minute.

3.12 “certified car inspector” means a person who is trained, qualified and certified to inspect and maintain car brake equipment.

3.14 “conventional train” means a train with the brake pipe air supplied from the controlling locomotive only.

3.17 “equipment” or “railway equipment” means railway locomotives, freight cars, passenger cars, and cabooses.

3.17.1 “Heritage railway” means a railway, which only operates or moves railway equipment of Historical significance.

3.17.2  “in service” means the use of Heritage railway equipment for the transportation of passengers.

3.18 “integrity” means having the unimpaired capability to supply air to the rear of the last piece of equipment of a train.

3.20 “lift” means the addition to a train of a solid coupled block of cars that have previously received a No.1A brake test at that location.

3.21 “locomotive or engine” means a rail vehicle propelled by any energy form, intended for the propulsion and/or control of passenger or service equipment.

3.22 “locomotive consist” means a combination of locomotives coupled together and operated from a single control.

3.22.1 “MOTI” means the provincial Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure.

3.24 “operative” means a brake that applies and releases and is in a suitable condition to retard and/or stop equipment.

3.25 “person in charge” means a person certified in accordance with Section 4 of these Guidelines, appointed by a railway company to ensure the safe conduct of a railway operation.

3.27 “psi” means pressure in pounds per square inch (“kpa” means the equivalent to 1000 newtons per square metre).

3.28 “pull-by inspection” means a visual examination, by a stationary qualified person, of a train operating at a speed not exceeding five (5) miles per hour (mph) (eight (8) kilometres per hour (km/h)) to verify that all brakes have released.

3.30 “qualified person” means in respect of a specified duty, a person who, because of knowledge, training and experience, is qualified to perform that duty safely and properly.

3.31 “railway company” means a railway or railway company subject to the Railway Safety Act.

3.32 “railway safety inspector” means a BCSA inspector designated pursuant to Section 4 (1) of the Railway Safety Act(BC).

3.33 “railway schedule” means an electronic or paper record that indicates the type of inspection, brake test and operational activity performed by a railway and the location where the activity is performed.

3.34 “running brake test” means a test of brakes performed on a moving train to ascertain that the brakes are operational and to confirm the operation of the dynamic brake prior to operating in territory set out in subsection 7.4 of these Rules.

3.35 “safety control” means a device(s) that will cause a brake application to be initiated automatically if the locomotive operator becomes incapacitated.

3.37 “supplemental source of air” means a supply of air to the brake pipe from a location other than the controlling locomotive.

3.39 “train” means an engine that is intended to operate;

  1. without cars; or
  2. with cars including a caboose occupied by a crew member; or
  3. with cars in passenger service. 

3.40 “train brake status system” means any method by which a railway company maintains information on the status of train brake inspections.

3.42 “train brake test device” means equipment, either fixed or mobile, used to control the supply of compressed air to operate the brakes on railway equipment.

4. Certification of Car Inspectors 

4.1 A Heritage railway shall ensure that its certified car inspectors are trained and qualified to perform brake tests on freight and/or passenger cars and trains and perform associated repairs in compliance with these Guidelines and in accordance with company procedures/work instructions, and all amendments, as in their Safety Management System (SMS). Certified car inspectors shall be conversant with these Guidelines and be able to demonstrate to a railway company, by means of oral or written examinations and on-the-job performance, a knowledge and ability concerning the performance of brake tests and associated repairs.

4.2 A Heritage railway shall include a full description of the training program, criteria and all amendments used for certifying car inspectors in their SMS.

4.3 A Heritage railway shall maintain a record of all certified car inspectors. This record shall be made available to a railway safety inspector upon request.

4.4 Certified car inspectors shall be re-certified if they have not been performing the duties prescribed in these Guidelines within the past three (3) years.

5. Qualified Persons

5.1 A Heritage railway shall ensure that its qualified persons are trained and qualified to perform the inspection and testing of brakes, associated control devices and safety controls in compliance with these Guidelines and in accordance with company procedures/work instructions, and all amendments, as provided in the company’s SMS.

5.2 A Heritage railway shall provide a full description of the training program, criteria and all amendments used for qualifying those employees performing brake tests in accordance with these Guidelines.

5.3 A Heritage railway shall maintain a record of all qualified persons. This record shall be made available to a railway safety inspector upon request.

6. Pre-Departure Requirement for Locomotives

6.1 When taking charge of a locomotive(s), except when changing off with another crew, the locomotive engineer or qualified person shall determine that all brakes are functional.

6.2 When the brake test is done by other than the locomotive engineer, the results of the test shall be made available to the locomotive engineer and be retained on record for ninety-two (92) days.

7. Operating Requirements 

7.1 A freight train shall operate with no less than eighty-five (85) percent of the train brakes operative, except as provided in Subsection 8.4 of these Guidelines.

7.3 A passenger train shall be operated with no less than eight-five (85) percent of the train brakes operative, including the locomotive(s), unless a reduction in train speed is made, as determined by the locomotive engineer, in accordance with company procedures/work instructions, and all amendments, as outlined in their SMS.

7.4 A running brake test of passenger train brakes shall be performed after leaving any location where the crew is changed in accordance with company procedures/work instructions.

7.5 When a train experiences a brake system or a safety control failure or malfunction while in service which cannot be readily corrected, the conductor, or in his/her absence, the locomotive engineer, shall report the location, date, time, description of the failure or malfunction and the appropriate action taken by the engineer, in accordance with company procedures/work instructions.

7.6 When the safety control on the controlling locomotive becomes inoperative while a train is while in service, it may be cut out, and as soon as possible, corrective action shall be taken to either repair the safety control or change the locomotive.

7.7 The locomotive engineer and the conductor shall be provided with the initial brake test results and while in service updates of the status of the train brakes.

Conventional Trains

7.8 A train having received a No.1 or 1A brake test or a continuity test may only depart a terminal if:

  1. the train line brake pipe pressure on the tail end of the train is within fifteen (15) psi (one hundred (100) kpa) of the locomotive brake pipe pressure, and,
  2. air flow to the brake pipe does not exceed sixty (60) cubic feet (one point seven (1.7) cubic metres) per minute, as indicated by the flow indicator or brake pipe leakage does not exceed five (5) psi (thirty-five (35) kpa) in sixty (60) seconds.

7.9 While in service, if the brake pipe air flow exceeds sixty (60) cubic feet per minute (CFM), when the automatic brake handle is in the release position, other than during intended brake application and/or release activity, corrective action must be taken if the flow does not return to sixty (60) CFM or below within a reasonable period of time, as determined by the locomotive engineer.

7.10 When the leading locomotive ceases to control a train while in service, a continuity test shall be made from the controlling locomotive, and as soon as possible, the controlling locomotive will be placed in the lead position. 

8. Exceptions

8.1 A car found to have bad order brakes at a safety inspection location or while in service in a train, may remain in the train, provided all the following requirements are observed:

  1. where appropriate, the brakes of the car or the affected truck shall be cut out;
  2. there are no more than two (2) consecutive inoperative control valves;
  3. there shall be a minimum of three (3) cars with operative brakes at the rear of a freight train;
  4. passenger trains shall have the brakes operational on at least one (1) truck on the last car in the train and no less than eight-five (85) percent of the brakes shall be operative; and
  5. passenger trains having cars with bolted couplers design may remain in service after a safety inspection, with the brakes cut out on the last car, when:
    1. appropriate action is taken by the locomotive engineer, in accordance with company procedures/work instructions, and
    2. the defective car is repaired, set off, or relocated in the consist of the train at the first safety inspection, and
    3. BCSA is advised of each occurrence.

8.2 A Heritage railway shall control and protect the movement of a car with inoperative brakes with a train brake status system in accordance with company procedures/work instructions. This may include the use of a bad order card.

8.3 The conductor, or in his or her absence, the locomotive engineer, shall be notified of cars with inoperative brakes in the train, and in turn, is responsible to ensure the train brake status system is updated in accordance with company procedures/work instructions.

8.4 Cars or locomotives with inoperative brakes due to damage may be moved in a train when authorized by a person in charge. In accordance with company procedures/work instructions, the person in charge will ensure that appropriate measures have been taken to move such equipment safely and identify the location where the equipment will be repaired.

8.5 On trains of eighteen (18) cars or less, when it is not possible to comply with Subsection 11.6 of these Guidelines, a train may proceed with equipment that has inoperative brakes provided that:

  1. the conductor and locomotive engineer are advised of the placement of such equipment in the train;
  2. the appropriate action, such as the reduction of train speed, is taken so as to ensure safe operation, in accordance with the railway’s procedures/work instructions;
  3. the requirements of Subsection 7.1 of these Guidelines are not exceeded.

8.9 In accordance with company procedures/work instructions, the person in charge may move cars or locomotives with inoperative brakes, due to damage while in service, at the rear of the train when no other option exists.

9. Corrective Action Reporting 

9.1 A Heritage railway shall reply in writing or by acceptable electronic means, within fourteen (14) days, to the BCSA, on the corrective action taken to correct a non-compliance(s) reported by a railway safety inspector. On defective equipment, the reply, from a railway officer, shall also include the equipment initials and number and the date and location of the corrective action taken.

Part II: Brake Test Requirements

10. General

10.1 A train shall not be operated or remain in service until a successful brake test(s), as outlined in this Part and in the Heritage railway’s procedures/work instructions has been performed and all appropriate documentation has been completed.  

10.2 No.1 and No.1A brake tests shall be performed on every train as specified in these Guidelines and company procedures/work instructions by:

  1. the brake pipe leakage method; or
  2. the air flow method.

10.3 The conductor, or in his or her absence, the locomotive engineer, shall be responsible for determining that the prescribed test(s) has been completed prior to departure.

10.4 A vehicle assisted No.1 brake test may be performed by a certified car inspector(s) in accordance with company procedures/work instructions, and shall be made available to a safety inspector upon request.

11. No. 1 Brake Test

11.1 A No.1 brake test shall be performed by a certified car inspector(s) when:

  1. trains are made up; and
  2. cars added to a train

11.3 A No.1 brake test shall verify:

  1. the integrity and continuity of the brake pipe;
  2. that the condition of the brake rigging on each car in the train meets the minimum requirement specified in Sections 20, 21 and 22 of these Guidelines;
  3. that the application and release of the brakes on each car is performed by visible verification of the piston or brake indicator device displacement; and
  4. that piston travel on each car is within the specified limits.

11.4 A pull-by inspection by a certified car inspector may be performed to verify the release of the train brakes.

11.5 Certified car inspectors shall report, in accordance with company procedures/work instructions, the results of all brake tests performed. Any brake system defect(s) discovered during the brake test and not repaired prior to departure shall be documented as bad order and reported to the conductor, or in his or her absence, the locomotive engineer. The conductor/engineer shall update the train brake status system with the identified defect(s). The results of the tests performed by certified car inspectors shall be retained for ninety-two (92) days.

11.6 After completing a No.1 brake test, a train may depart from a safety inspection with ninety-five (95) percent of the train brakes operative, once every reasonable effort has been made to maintain one hundred (100) percent operative brakes. This requirement does not apply to cars referred to in Subsection 8.4 of these Guidelines.

12. No. 1A Brake Test

12.1 No.1A brake test shall be performed by a qualified person(s) when:

  1. trains are made up;
  2. cars are added to the train while it is in daily service;

12.4 A No.1A brake test shall verify:

  1. the integrity and continuity of the brake pipe; and
  2. the application and release of the brakes on each car.

12.5 When applying the brakes on each car, a brake pipe reduction of at least six (6) psi must be indicated on air gauge attached to the rear car. When not equipped with an air gauge, a full service application must be made.

12.6 A qualified person(s) shall record and report the test results, and any brake system defect(s) discovered during the brake test, to the train brake status system, in accordance with company procedures/work instruction.

12.7 The conductor, or in his or her absence, the locomotive engineer, shall be responsible for determining that the prescribed test(s) has been completed prior to commencing daily service.

12.8 The results of the No.1A brake tests performed:

  1. by the train crew shall be recorded and retained until the train finishes daily service.

13. Continuity Test

13.1 A continuity test shall be performed by a qualified person(s) when:

  1. a solid block(s) of coupled cars which have received a No.1 or No.1A brake test are added to a train;
  2. the controlling locomotive has been attached to a train having received a No.1 or No.1A brake test;
  3. the locomotive consist has been exchanged or altered;
  4. the locomotive engineer has been changed (unless provisions of 13.3 are met);
  5. the brake pipe has been re-coupled after being uncoupled; and/or
  6. the locomotive is re-coupled to the train after setting off cars.

13.2 The continuity test shall verify the capability to transmit a signal between the leading locomotive and to the rear of the last piece of equipment on the train.

13.3 A continuity test need not be performed when the locomotive engineer has been changed, provided that all of the following provisions are met:

  1. must be a direct handoff at the crew change location (crew to crew at controlling locomotive). Does not apply to trains left unattended while waiting for the outgoing crew.
  2. train must not perform any lifts or set-offs at the crew change location. In such case, continuity must be established, unless the lift or setoff has occurred and continuity has been established prior to a direct handoff;
  3. the controlling locomotive must be equipped with operative dynamic brake (this provision does not supersede the requirements of Item 21.1 of the Railway Locomotive Inspection and Safety Rules).

18. The Use of Back-Up Hoses or Valves

18.1 The use of back-up hoses and valves are not permitted on Heritage railway passenger trains.

Part III: Equipment Requirements

20. Maintenance

20.1 All brake equipment shall be maintained in a safe and serviceable condition.

  1. freight car brakes shall be maintained in accordance with the current AAR requirements and railway company procedures/work instructions;
  2. passenger car brakes shall be maintained in accordance with the current American Public Transit Authority (APTA) requirements and railway company procedures/work instructions. At the end of the Clean Oil Test & Stencil (COT&S) periodic maintenance interval passenger car brake valves shall be maintained:
    1. to APTA requirements or;
    2. a single car air brake test shall be performed every 365 days or less and defective components are to be replaced as required.
  3. locomotive brakes shall be maintained as a minimum in accordance with manufacturer’s recommendations and railway company procedures/work instructions. Locomotive brake systems shall receive COT&S maintenance as follows:
    1. At intervals that do not exceed 1,104 days for locomotives equipped with a 26-L or equivalent brake system; or
    2. At intervals that do not exceed 1,472 days for locomotives equipped with an air dryer and a 26-L or equivalent brake system and for locomotives not equipped with an air compressor and that are semi-permanently coupled and dedicated to locomotives with an air dryer; or
    3. At intervals that do not exceed 1,840 days for locomotives equipped with air dryers and electronic air brake system including the following: CCB-1, CCB-2, CCB-26, EPIC 1 (formerly EPIC 3102), EPIC 3102D2, EPIC 2, KB-HS1, or Fastbrake brake systems; or
    4. At intervals that do not exceed 736 days for locomotives equipped with a brake system not specifically identified in paragraphs i, ii, and iii.

20.2 On locomotives or self-propelled equipment, the date of testing or cleaning of brake equipment and the name of the shop or location at which the work was done shall be retained in the cab in a format in accordance with railway company procedures/work instructions.

20.3 Train brake test devices shall be cleaned, repaired and tested every ninety (90) days, to maintain safe and satisfactory operation, in accordance with company procedures/work instructions. 

20.4 A locomotive that is out service for 30 or more consecutive days may use the time to extend the Clean Oil Test & Stencil maintenance date. An out of service record shall be retained as per company procedures/work instructions. A locomotive can have one or more periods of 30 or more consecutive out of service days. Each period must be recorded as above. Once COT&S air-brake changeout is completed, all credit days revert to zero days.

21. Brake Cylinder Piston Travel 

21.1 A car with a body-mounted brake cylinder has piston travel out of adjustment
when: 

  1. on a freight car, the piston travel is less than six (6) inches (one hundred fifty (150) mm) or more than nine (9) inches (two hundred thirty (230) mm);
  2. on a passenger car, the piston travel is less than seven (7) inches (one hundred eighty (180) mm) or more than nine (9) inches (two hundred thirty (230) mm).

21.2 A car with truck-mounted brake cylinders shall have piston travel, unless otherwise governed by design, sufficient to provide brake shoe clearance when the brake is released.

  1. on a freight car, piston travel shall not exceed five (5) inches (one hundred twenty-
    five (125) mm);
  2. on a passenger car, piston travel shall not exceed six (6) inches (one hundred fifty
    (150) mm).

21.3 A freight car with a special type of brake equipment, not covered by the above, shall have piston travel adjusted as indicated on the badge plate or stenciling applied in a conspicuous location near the brake cylinder. 

21.4 A passenger car with a special type of brake equipment, not covered by the above, shall have the brakes maintained in accordance with company procedures/work instructions. 

21.5 On a locomotive, the maximum physical limit of brake cylinder piston travel will be indicated in the cab. In operation, piston travel must not come within two (2) inches (fifty (50) mm) of the limit. For example, should the brake cylinder permit an eight (8) inch (two hundred (200) mm) travel, the maximum piston travel shall not exceed six (6) inches (one hundred fifty (150) mm).

22. Locomotive Feed Valves and Pressure Settings 

22.1 Air pressure feed valves shall be adjusted to the following pressures in accordance with company procedures/work instructions:

  1. the minimum brake pipe pressure with the automatic brake valve in release position shall be ninety (90) psi (six hundred twenty (620) kpa) for passenger service;
  2. the minimum differential between the brake pipe and main reservoir air pressures with the brake valve handle in release position shall be fifteen (15) psi (one hundred (100) kpa);
  3. the independent brake cylinder pressure shall be the full application pressure, as posted in cab.

Part IV: Filing Requirements

23. Safety Management System (SMS) Requirements

23.2 A Heritage railway shall include in their SMS, procedures/work instructions, and all amendments, for:

  1. No.1 brake test,
  2. Vehicle assisted No. 1 brake tests,
  3. Brake tests of trains having a supplementary source of air supply at a location other than the head end locomotives,
  4. Train brake testing device calibration,
  5. No.1A brake test, including the audit protocol used by the railway to ensure compliance,
  6. Continuity test,
  7. Running brake test,
  8. Single car test,
  9. Locomotive functional brake test,
  10. Calibration of locomotive brake pipe flow indicator/metre,
  11. Portable locomotive control device tilt test and modified tilt test,
  12. Reporting of brake system failures,
  13. Control and protection of a movement of cars and locomotives with damaged or inoperative brakes due to damage,
  14. Control and protection of a movement of cars or locomotives with inoperative brakes at the rear of the train, due to damage while in service, when no other option exists,
  15. Movement of 18 cars or less with less than ninety-five (95) percent of operative brakes,
  16. Repairs to air brake components,
  17. Updating of the train brake status system,
  18. Air pressure feed valves adjustment, and
  19. A brake system or a safety control failure or malfunction while in service which cannot be readily corrected.
  20. Procedure to follow when a brake system component found to have been tampered with while in service.
  21. Locomotive out of service record and return to service tests.

Railway Locomotive Inspection and Safety Guidelines for British Columbia Heritage Railways

 July 3, 2015

PART 1 - GENERAL

1. Short Title

1.1 For ease of reference, these Guidelines may be referred to as the "Locomotive Safety Guidelines"

2. Scope

2.1 These Guidelines prescribe the minimum safety standards for locomotives operated by railway companies subject to the jurisdiction of MOTI pursuant to the Railway Safety Act (BC).

3. Definitions

In these Guidelines:

3.1 a) "bad order" means a locomotive having a defect as defined in Part III of these Guidelines;

b) "bad order information system" means any method, computerized or otherwise, by which a railway company controls and protects the movement of a locomotive with defects;

3.2 "break" means a fracture resulting in complete separation into parts. The term "break" and "broken" are used interchangeably in these Guidelines;

3.3 "candela" means the unit of luminous intensity of a light source;

3.6 "certified locomotive inspector" means a person whom is qualified to perform safety inspection of locomotives pursuant to subsection 6.1;

3.7 "certified safety glazing material" means a glazing material that has been certified by the manufacturer as having met the testing requirements that is equivalent to, or exceeds North American standards. Note: Certified safety glazing material shall be used when replacing original window materials;

3.8 "certificate" means a document that identifies the employee and the task(s) for which such employee is certified;

3.9 "controlling locomotive" means a locomotive in the position from which the crew is operating the train;

3.10 "cracked" means fractured without complete separation into parts;

3.12 "dBA" means an abbreviated symbol for a sound level measured on the "A" weighted slow response scale of a sound level meter;

3.15  “dynamic brake” means a train braking system whereby the kinetic energy of a moving train is used to generate electric current at the locomotive traction motors, which is then dissipated through resistor grids or into the catenary or third rail;

3.16  “dynamic brake holding feature” means a feature that holds or maintains dynamic brake if an emergency or penalty brake application occurs for any reason;

3.20 "fire season" means the period of time from April 1st to October 31st;

3.21 "five flute horn" means the horn is composed of 5 projectors sounded in unison, with the following fundamental frequencies: 261 Hz, 311 Hz, 440 Hz, 470 Hz, and 512 Hz, +/- 20 Hz; The assembled horn should have the minimum 1/3 octave band SPL in the 2000-3 150 Hz range, not less than 12 dB below the maximum 1/3 octave band SPL in the 250-1250 Hz range;

3.21.1 “Heritage railway” means a railway, which only operates or moves railway equipment of Historical significance;

3.22 "high level mode" means a minimum sound level, intended for emergency use, of one hundred and ten (110) dB(A), at any location on an arc of 30 meters (100 feet) radius, and subtended forward of the locomotive by angles 45 degrees to the left and to the right of the centerline of the track in the direction of travel;

3.23 "in service" means all locomotives except those which are:

  1. "bad order" and/or being moved to another location for repair(s) as provided in 5.2 of these Guidelines;
  2. in a repair shop or on a repair track;
  3. on a storage track and are dead and drained;

3.24 "lead locomotive" means the first locomotive proceeding in the direction of movement;

3.25 "locomotive consist" means a combination of locomotives operated from a single control;

3.26 "locomotive or engine" means a rail vehicle including cabcars propelled by any energy form, other than steam, intended for the propulsion and/or control of freight, passenger or service equipment. The term locomotive and engine are used interchangeably in these Guidelines;

3.27 “locomotive remanufactured” means a locomotive rebuilt or refurbished from a previously used or refurbished underframe containing fewer than 25% previously used components of its original structure;

3.28 "low level mode" means a sound level, intended for normal operation, of ninety six (96) dB(A) +6, -0, at any location on an arc of 30 meters (100 feet) radius, and subtended forward of the locomotive or by angles 45 degrees to the left and to the right of the centerline of the track in the direction of travel;

3.28.1  “MOTI” means the provincial Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure;

3.29 "operative" means a component or system is in a safe condition to perform its intended function;

3.30 "passenger locomotive" means a locomotive used to pull an undefined number of rail car(s) designated for the transportation of passengers;

3.31 "person in charge" means a certified person in accordance with subsection 6.1, appointed by a railway company to ensure the safe conduct of an operation or the work of employees;

3.32 "qualified person" means, in respect to a specified duty, a person who, because of knowledge, training and experience is qualified to perform that duty safely and properly;

3.33 "railway company" means a railway company subject to the Railway Safety Act (BC);

3.34 "railway safety inspector" means an inspector designated pursuant to section 4 of the Railway Safety Act (BC);

3.35 "safety control" means a device(s) which will cause a brake application to be initiated automatically if the locomotive operator becomes incapacitated;

3.36 "safety defect" means any item or component that is defective on a locomotive as prescribed in Part III of these Guidelines;

3.37 "safety inspection" means an examination of a locomotive for safety defects while stationary by a certified locomotive inspector or a person in charge as defined herein, to verify that it may move safely, and to identify those defects listed in Part III of these Guidelines which may inhibit such movement and require correction. Safety inspections are intended to be of a visual nature;

3.38 "safety inspection location" means a location designated by a railway company where certified locomotive inspector perform safety inspections;

3.39 "safety inspection record" means a record in hard copy form or otherwise, including a computer record, which attests that a safety inspection as defined herein was performed;

3.39.1 “SMS” means a Safety Management System as required by section 21 (2) of the Railway Safety Act (BC);

3.40 "three flute horn" means the horn is composed of 3 projectors sounded in unison, with the following fundamental frequencies: 261 Hz, 311 Hz, 470Hz, +/- 20Hz; the assembled horn should have the minimum 1/3 octave band SPL in the 2000-3150 Hz range, not less than 12 dB below the maximum 1/3 octave band SPL in the 250-1250 Hz range;

3.41 "train" means locomotive(s), with or without cars;

3.42 "yard service" means locomotives involved exclusively in switching, marshalling, humping, trimming and Heritage railway switching.

4. Railway Company Responsibility

4.1 A railway company is responsible for the inspection and repair of all locomotives to ensure safe operation. All components, appurtenances and control apparatuses of all locomotives must be designed and maintained to perform their intended function.

4.2 A railway company shall reply in writing or by acceptable electronic means, within fourteen (14) days, or as directed by the railway safety inspector, to the BCSA, on the corrective action taken to correct a violation/defect reported by a railway safety inspector. The reply, from an appropriate railway officer, shall also include the unit initials and number and the date and location of the corrective action taken.

5. Application of Safety Inspections and Movement Restrictions

5.1 A railway company shall ensure that locomotives placed or continued in service are free from all safety defects described in Part III of these Guidelines.

5.2 Locomotives identified with safety defects may be moved to a designated location for repair, when authorized by a person in charge, who shall ensure that:

  1. the locomotive is safe to move;
  2. a means to protect the locomotive's safe movement is implemented, including, identifying to all employees involved the defects which restrict the locomotive(s) movements, the designated location for repair and the name of the person in charge authorizing the movement; and,
  3. the movement of a locomotive with safety defects shall be controlled and protected by the use of a bad order information system, the appropriate records will be retained for a period of ninety two (92) days.

6. Certified Locomotive Inspector

6.1 A railway company shall ensure that certified locomotive inspectors are trained to perform safety inspections of locomotives in compliance with these Guidelines. Certified locomotive inspectors must demonstrate to a railway company by means of oral or written examination and on-the-job performance, a knowledge and ability concerning safety inspection of railway locomotives.

6.2 A railway company shall maintain a record of certified locomotive inspectors who perform safety inspections. This record shall be made available to a railway safety inspector upon request.

6.3 Certified locomotive inspectors shall be recertified if they have not been performing the duties prescribed in these Guidelines for a period extending over three years.

7. Safety Inspection Locations

7.2  Safety inspection requirements:

b.   all locomotives on a train for the purpose of passenger use only placed in service or laid over for more than eight (8) hours shall receive a safety inspection.

7.3 A railway company shall maintain a record of all locomotives which received a safety inspection. This information will be retained for a minimum of ninety two (92) days and will be made available to a railway safety inspector upon request.

7.5 Prior to departure of a train where locomotive(s) receiving a Safety Inspection have been placed in service or placed on a train, the Locomotive operator shall be notified that a Safety Inspection has been made. Such notification shall include any information required for movement of safety defects as provided in Section 5.2 of these Guidelines.

8. Pre-Departure Inspection

8.1 At locations other than Safety Inspection Locations, where a locomotive is placed in service, or a locomotive layover of more than 8 hours has occurred, the locomotive shall, as a minimum requirement have a pre-departure inspection by either the locomotive operator or other qualified person for those conditions listed in Appendix I.

8.2 The locomotive operator shall be responsible for determining that the prescribed inspection has been completed prior to departure.

8.3 At locations other than Safety Inspection Locations all operating locomotives shall receive a safety inspection at intervals not exceeding forty five (45) days or 1080 operating hours, or a minimum of at least once per year.

PART II -LOCOMOTIVES DESIGN REQUIREMENTS

10. General Design

10.1 The locomotive shall be designed and constructed to provide for safe operation and protection of the operating crews and property from accidents caused by functional failure of locomotives.

10.2

(b) Passenger Locomotives

After January 1, 2015 new and remanufactured locomotives travelling at speeds exceeding 25 MPH (40 KPH) shall be designed and constructed as a minimum in accordance with the latest revision of the “American Public Transit Association” (APTA), the Association of American Railroad Manual of Standards and Recommended Practices or equivalent standard.

10.3 Passageways and walkways shall be properly treated with anti-skid decking to provide secure footing.

10.4 A locomotive consist with open end platforms shall have a means of safe passage between them. There shall be a continuous barrier across the full width of the end of a locomotive or a continuous barrier between locomotives.

11. Audible Signals

All locomotives must be equipped with horns and bells that meet the specifications of these Guidelines;

11.1 Passenger Locomotives

11.1.1 Passenger locomotives must be equipped or retrofitted with horns capable of producing a high and a low level sound.

11.1.2 Controls

  1. The horn switch shall be located in such a manner as to allow for convenient access from the locomotive operator's normal working position.
  2. The control valve shall be located at or near the horn, to ensure a crisp sound and minimize the time delay response.

11.1.3 Location

The horn shall be mounted:

  • in the direction of travel
  • near the front of the roof
  • no further than 1.5 meter (5 feet) behind the rear of the cab
  • near the centerline of the locomotive with no obstructions or exhaust outlets ahead of or beside the horn.

11.1.4 Design Types

Locomotives shall be equipped with:

  1. one single five flute horn capable of producing two different sound levels-low level mode or high level mode; or
  2. two separate horns:
    1. one three or five flute horn that produces the low level mode; and
    2. one five flute horn that produces the high level mode;

 

11.1.5 Compliance

(a) When tested in an anechoic chamber meeting the requirements of ISO 3745 (18-22 deg C, 45%-65% rel. hum., 990-1025 millibars), the horn shall produce a minimum sound pressure level of 143 dB(A) at one meter from the front of the horn. The railway shall retain the horn manufacturers Certificate of Compliance and test records for not less than 10 years.

(b) On new and retrofitted locomotives, the railway must ensure that the horn design is certified and the installation is tested as per the requirements of these Guidelines.

11.3 Bell

All locomotives operating in a controlling position shall be equipped with a bell, or other device capable of producing an equivalent sound, meeting the following design criteria:

  1. must produce a minimum sound level of 60 dBA at any location on an arc of 15 meters (50 feet) radius subtended forward of the locomotive by angles 45 degrees to the left and to the right of the centreline of the track in the direction of travel;
  2. the control of the bell shall be located to allow for convenient operation from the locomotive operator's normal operating location.

13. Safety Control Equipment

13.1 A controlling locomotive must be equipped with a safety control system which shall, as a minimum, initiate a full service brake application and remove all tractive effort in the event that the person operating the locomotive becomes inattentive or incapacitated.

13.2 A controlling locomotive equipped with a safety control system with roll-away protection must:

  1. be wired such that the safety control system power source is fed through the battery knife switch or circuit breaker;
  2. meet the requirements of the most current "Association of American Railroads Manual of Standards and Recommended Practices" (S-5513); and
  3. commence safety control system warning timing cycle and subsequently initiate a penalty brake application of the train air brakes should any of the following occur:
  1. power is interrupted to the safety control system;
  2. locomotive brake cylinder pressure is less than 25 psi; and
  3. speed is detected.

14. Safety Appliances

14.1 Safety appliances on locomotives shall be in compliance with “Railway Safety Appliance Standards Guidelines for Heritage Railways”

15. Spark Arresting Devices

15.1 Locomotives shall be equipped with a spark arresting device or a turbo-charger.

16. Illuminating Devices

16.1 Locomotives operating in a leading position shall be equipped with headlight(s) meeting the following design criteria:

  1. must be equipped with a minimum of one headlight that produces at least 200,000 candela;
  2.  
    1. headlight(s) on locomotives other than in designated service must be aligned to centreline in the horizontal plane and depressed in the vertical plane to strike the rail at 244 metres (800 feet) ahead of the locomotive in the direction of travel;
    2. headlight(s) on designated or yard service locomotives must be aligned to centreline in the horizontal plane and depressed in the vertical plane to strike the rail at 91.5 metres (300 feet) ahead of the locomotive in the direction of travel;
  3. headlight(s) must be provided with a dimming device that reduces normal operating voltage in nominally 50%. The control of such device must be located to allow for convenient operation from the locomotive operator's normal operating location;
  4. locomotives must be equipped with a rear headlight or have an illuminating device to provide for a safe switching operation.

16.2 Leading locomotives, other than in designated and/or yard service, must be equipped, in the direction of travel, with ditch lights or a suitable alternative that is filed with the MOTI meeting the following design criteria:

  1. must be equipped with two ditch lights in the direction of travel, each of which produces at least 200,000 candela;
  2.  
    1. ditch lights must be mounted at least 91.5 cm (36 inches) above the top of rail. They shall be spaced a minimum of 91.5 cm (36 inches) apart, unless the vertical distance between the headlight and the ditch light center lines is less than 152.5 cm (60 inches), in which case the ditch lights must be spaced at least 152.5 cm (60 inches) apart;
    2. diesel multiple units, electric multiple units and control cab cars are exempted from the mounting height requirement in paragraph [(b)i] where such placement would compromise the integrity of the car body or be otherwise impracticable. In such cases ditch lights must be mounted at least 61 cm (24 inches) above the top of rail;
  3. ditch lights shall be aligned in the horizontal plane to cross the locomotive centreline 122 metres (400 feet) ahead of the locomotive and depressed in the vertical plane to strike the rail at 244 metres (800 feet) in the direction of travel.

16.3 Locomotives operating in a controlling position must be equipped with means of illuminating the control instruments, meters and gauges to enable the locomotive operator to make accurate readings from the normal operating location without interfering with the operator's vision of track and signals.

17. Safety Glazing

17.1 Locomotives, other than in designated service, must be equipped with certified safety glazing material on all windows of the operating and/or occupied cabs.

18. Fail Safe Circuits and Systems

18.1 Any component of electrical or mechanical systems, vital to the safety of locomotive occupants or the general public, shall in the case of failure retain the locomotive in a safe operating condition.

19. Fuel Tanks

19.2 Fuel tanks shall be provided with suitable liquid level gauges, so located that the fuel level in the tanks can be determined when the tanks are being filled. Gauges must be protected against accidental breakage where loss of fuel would be incurred.

PART III - LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION REQUIREMENTS

21. Brake System

21.1 The brake system and all related components, including the handbrake, must be tested and maintained in operative condition, as per procedures issued by the railway company and identified in the company’s Railway Safety Management System (SMS).  Dynamic brake must be tested and maintained in operative condition. Locomotives that have not been previously tested cannot be set out and placed on a train requiring use of their dynamic brake feature until they have been tested at a locomotive safety inspection location.

21.5 (a)   Dynamic brake is considered a supplemental braking system however company instructions and procedures shall ensure that the friction brakes are sufficient by themselves, without the aid of dynamic brakes, to stop the train safely under all operating conditions.

(b)    A locomotive may be operated with inoperative dynamic brake.

22. Trucks

22.1 A railway company shall not place, or continue in service, a locomotive with any of the following truck related defects:

  1. truck frames, swing hangers, swing hanger pins or equalizers cracked or broken;
  2. suspension components such as coil or rubber springs, elliptic springs, snubbers and dampers must not be missing, cracked, broken or out of place and must be properly secured.

22.2 All components attached to the truck frames must be properly secured.

22.3 The bolster side bearing and pedestal clearances shall be maintained within manufacturer's specifications.

22.4 The truck frame, brake rigging and associated components of locomotives shall be kept free from accumulation of oil, grease and other combustible materials.

23. Wheels and Axles

23.1 A railway company shall not place, or continue in service, a locomotive with any of the following wheel defects:

  1. flange thickness of 7/8 inches (22.2 mm) or less;
  2. vertical flange of 1 inch (25.4 mm) or more;
  3. a flange height of 1 ½ inches (38.1 mm) or more measured from tread to the top of the flange;
  4.  
    1. a curved plate wheel with a rim thickness of 1 inch (25.4 mm) or less;
    2. a straight plate wheel with a rim thickness of 1 inch (25.4 mm) or less;
    3. a straight or curved plate wheel with a rim thickness of 3/4 inch (19.0 mm) or less, on locomotives used in yard services
  5. a flat spot of 2 ½ inches (63.5 mm) or more in length or, in the case of multiple flat spots, 2 inches (50.8 mm) or more in length;
  6. a gouge or chip in the flange that is more than 1 ½ inches (38.1 mm) in length and ½ inch (12.7 mm) in width;
  7. a shell of 2 ½ inches (63.5 mm) or more in length or, in the case of multiple shells, 2 inches (50.8 mm) or more in length;
  8. tread worn hollow 5/16 inch (7.9 mm) or more;
  9. a crack in the rim, plate or hub;
  10. a loose wheel;
  11. the variation in the circumference of wheels may not exceed ¼ " or 2 tapes on the same axle when applied or threaded.

23.2 A railway company shall not place or continue in service a locomotive with a traction motor support bearing that shows evidence of:

  1. signs of overheating;
  2. loose or missing bolts;
  3. oil leaking from reservoir;
  4. missing or defective reservoir filler cup, or drain plug not properly secured.

23.3 A railway company shall not place or continue in service a locomotive with any of the following journal bearing safety defects:

  1. a loose or damaged seal;
  2. loose or missing end cap bolt;
  3. signs of overheating; and
  4. a missing or defective gasket or drain plug not properly secured.

24. Draft Systems

24.1 A railway company shall not place or continue in service a locomotive with any of the following coupler related defects:

  1. a coupler shank that is bent out of alignment to the extent that the coupler will not couple automatically;
  2. a coupler knuckle that is broken or cracked on the inside pulling face of the knuckle, except that shrinkage cracks or hot tears that do not significantly reduce the strength of the knuckle shall not be considered cracked;
  3. a knuckle pin or thrower that is missing or inoperative;
  4. a coupler retaining pin lock that is missing or broken;
  5. a coupler with an inoperative lock lift or a coupler assembly that does not have anticreep protection to prevent unintentional unlocking of the coupler lock; locomotives in passenger service must be equipped with a device that locks the lock lift assembly to ensure prevention of unintentional uncoupling;
  6. a coupler lock that is missing, inoperative, bent, cracked or broken;
  7. a coupler not falling within the following heights above the rails,
    • minimum height: 31 ½ inches (800 mm);
    • maximum height: 34 ½ inches (876 mm);
  8. a coupler that has a crack in the area of the shank or head represented by the unshaded portion of figure 1, except that shrinkage cracks or hot tears that do not significantly reduce the strength of the coupler shall not be considered cracked.
    Cracked Coupler
  9. an inoperative uncoupling device.

24.2 A railway company shall not place or continue in service a locomotive with a draft arrangement that shows evidence of:

  1. a draft gear that is inoperative;
  2. a cracked or broken yoke;
  3. a vertical coupler pin retainer that is missing or defective;
  4. a draft gear carrier plate that is missing or has more than 25% of the fasteners loose or missing;
  5. a draft stop that is missing or broken to the extent that it no longer performs its design function.

25. Fuel Tanks

25.1 Exterior of fuel tanks of the locomotive shall be kept free from accumulation of oil, grease and other combustible material.

25.2 Fuel tanks, filling adapters, pumps, piping, valves and connections shall be kept free from leaks, properly secured and in operative condition.

25.3 The fuel tank vent must be kept clear of obstructions.

26. Internal Combustion Engines

26.1 The engine and engine room shall be kept free from accumulation of oil, grease, fuel oil, and other combustible material. Pollution control tanks shall be kept free from leakage and/or from overflow.

26.2 Locomotives operated in service during the fire season, shall have exhaust passages on the discharge side of spark arresting devices or turbo-chargers kept free of oil accumulation and carbonaceous deposits in excess of 1/8 inch (3 mm) in thickness.

27. Rail Clearance

27.1 No part or appliance of a locomotive, excepting wheels and flexible non metallic sand pipe extension tips, shall be less than 2 ½ inches (63 mm) above the top of the rail.

28. Windows

28.1 Windows on controlling locomotives, shall be kept clean and free from cracks or obstructions. All related components, on controlling locomotives, such as wipers, sun visors and defrosters shall be kept in operative condition.

 

 

29. Safety Control Equipment

29.1 A controlling locomotive shall not be placed in service other than in designated and/or yard service, without an operative reset safety control.

29.2 A controlling locomotive in designated and/or yard service which is not equipped with a reset safety control shall have an operative safety control foot pedal.

29.3 A controlling locomotive equipped with a safety control system with roll-away protection shall not be placed in service unless it meets the requirements listed in Part II – Locomotive Design Requirements, Section 13.2.

29.4 It must be communicated to affected railway employees when a locomotive is equipped with a safety control system with roll-away protection.

30. Safety Appliances

30.1 All safety appliances, as described in “Railway Safety Appliance Standards Guidelines for Heritage Railways” shall be kept in a safe and operative condition.

31. Speed Indicator

31.1 A controlling locomotive shall not be placed in service other than in designated service without operative speed indicator(s).

33. Audible Signals

33.1 All audible signal equipment on controlling locomotives shall be in operative condition.

34. Illuminating Devices

34.1 All illuminating devices shall be secured and be in operative condition.

PART IV - SMS REQUIREMENTS

35. Filing Requirements with the BCSA

35.1 A railway company shall maintain specification records for each of its locomotives. These records shall be made available to the BCSA upon request. (Appendix II)

35.2 A railway company shall retain on file and provide to the BCSA upon request the following safety guidelines and procedures as amended:

  1. design specifications for the configuration of speed indicators and cab speakers on passenger locomotives;
  2. specifications for couplers not falling within the following heights above the rails;
  • minimum height - 31 ½ inches (800 mm);
  • maximum height -34 ½ inches (876 mm);
  1. testing procedures for reset safety control systems;
  2. method of testing window and door safety glazing;
  3. testing procedures for audible signals.

35.4 A railway company if requested, shall file with the BCSA a full description of the training program and criteria used:

  1. to perform safety inspections, and;
  2. to perform pre-departure inspections in accordance with Appendix 1.

35.5 A railway company may operate locomotives with advanced technology/operational improvements provided that the testing and operating procedures have been filed with the BCSA thirty (30) days prior to testing and placing in service.

PART V - STEAM LOCOMOTIVES

37. Steam Locomotives

37.1 For the purpose of Part V, a "locomotive or engine" means a self-propelled unit of equipment, powered by steam that is either designed or used for moving other equipment. This includes a self-propelled unit designed or used to carry freight and/or passenger traffic.

37.2 Steam powered locomotives shall be inspected and maintained in accordance with RAC Steam Locomotive Safety Inspection Circular No. MC 3 - http://www.railcan.ca/assets/images/regulations/circulars/CIRCULAR_NO._M-3-FINAL_EN.pdf

Boiler and steam requirements shall be maintained and inspected in accordance with the BCSA Boiler department regulations.

37.3 Each railway company which operates, or intends to operate, steam powered locomotives shall:

  1. notify the BCSA Boiler department at least thirty (30) days in advance of the first date of such operation, and
  2. notify the BCSA Boiler department in advance of any periodic inspections, as required in RAC Circular No. MC 3 -
    http://www.railcan.ca/assets/images/regulations/circulars/CIRCULAR_NO._M-3-FINAL_EN.pdf

 

 

APPENDIX I/II FOR RAILWAY LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND SAFETY GUIDELINES 

Appendix I: Pre-Departure Inspection by a Locomotive Operator or Other Qualified Person

As per subsection 8.1, a pre-departure inspection of locomotive(s) shall be performed by the locomotive, operator or other qualified person for the following:

  1. brake test including the operation of the safety control system;
  2. hand brake;
  3. headlights and ditch lights;
  4. trucks and running gear;
  5. any other apparent safety hazard likely to cause an accident or casualty.

2. Exceptions are to be reported for correction.

Appendix II: Locomotive Specification Records

A railway company shall maintain specification records, as referenced in the "Locomotive Safety Guidelines, Part IV”, for each of its owned or leased locomotives. This information will be made available to the BCSA upon request.

A railway company shall retain records of any alternations which affect data recorded;

  • Loco Number
    • Loco Initial
    • Loco Type
    • Loco Propulsion
  • Operating Railway
    • Built By
    • Date
  • Number and type of traction motors
  • Engine, type and horsepower
  • Locomotive brake equipment type
  • Dynamic Brake: Yes/No
    • Type
  • Type of safety control system
  • Event Recorder: Yes/No
    • Type
  • Anti-climber arrangement designed to withstand a minimum of (enter data) pounds
  • Collision posts designed to withstand a longitudinal force of (enter data) pounds each at 30 inches above the deck and (enter data) pounds at the underframe.
  • Short hood structured-facing area skin is equivalent to (enter data) steel plate psi yield strength.
  • Total weight in working order (enter data) pounds
  • Starting tractive effort at (enter data) % adhesion (enter data) pounds
  • AAR requirement for fuel tanks
  • Pilot Type
    • Front
    • Rear

Railway Fee Schedule 2016 - 2017

Notes from BCSA Railway Town Hall Meetings 2015

BC Safety Authority held three Town Hall meetings for railway clients during the month of September. Representatives from Common Carrier, Industrial, Siding and Spur and Heritage railways were in attendance.

Monday September 14th     New Westminster, British Columbia
Attendees: Canfor Pulp Taylor, Mitsui Homes Canada, Southern Railway BC, BCR Properties, BCIT Training Railway, Western Forest Products Woss, Canexus North Vancouver, Lehigh Cement Delta, Fraser Valley Heritage Railway, RTC Rail Solutions, Railtime Consultancy.

Tuesday September 15th      Prince George, British Columbia
Attendees: Pinnacle Renewable Energy, Westfraser Lumber Quesnel, Chetwynd Mechanical Pulp, Cariboo Pulp & Paper Quesnel, Lafarge Fort St John, Dunkley Lumber, Quesnel River Pulp, Carrier Lumber Prince George, Prince George Pulp & Paper, RTC Rail Solutions, Universal Railway Operations.

Thursday September 17th           Kamloops, British Columbia
Attendees: Sullivan Mine & Railway Historical Society, Tolko Armstrong Lumber, Kamloops Heritage Railway, Moly-Cop, HCA Mountain Minerals, Tolko Heffley Creek, RTC Rail Solutions, Universal Rail Systems.

 

The main points of discussion were as follows:

A Year in Review:

  • Once again we did not have a fatality related to railway operations on a provincially regulated railway in the past year. There were fatalities on the commuter railways which are not attributed to the railways operations, these were suicides.
  • BCSA continues to develop its “As Found Hazards" method of rating risk. Hazards found during assessments are rated according to risk on a scale of one through five, five being the highest risk. This rating is then applied to the non-compliances observed by safety officers. Therefore, each non-compliance can carry a different weight based on the hazard it represents. It is the weight of the non-compliances, rather than the number of non-compliances, that determine how client fees are annually assessed. This same process also applies to accidents. It is the severity of the accident, not necessarily the number of accidents, that affects a client's fees.
  • BCSA intends to partner with BCIT in the new year to produce a series of railway safety videos which will be posted on BCSA's website. The first video will deal with safely securing railway equipment.

 

Railway Web Page Review:

  • The following items on BCSA’s Railway web page were reviewed:
  • Annual Statistics
  • Railway Safety Directives on Blue Flags and Clearance
  • Consultant Matrix
  • Railway Supervisor Transfer Process
  • Railway Risk Assessment Form
  • Annual Statistics (Railway Statistics on webpage)
  • The first graph shows that the number of Industrial Railways and Sidings and Spurs has remained steady since 2014. This is because we have pulled back in our efforts to identify new rail operations in the province due to limited resources. We have surveyed most of the province and will focus on capturing those operations that are not part of the system in the new year. The last area we will focus on is the Greater Vancouver area.
  • The Accidents and Incidents graph shows that there has been a decrease in accidents year to date in 2015. This can be attributed in part due to a lockout at Southern Railway Vancouver Island (SRYVI) which saw the company cut services and operate with management personnel. One possible explanation for SRYVI's dramatic drop in accidents was that management crews were shadowed by locked out union members who scrutinized their switching. We believe this speaks to the effectiveness of proficiency testing and having trained supervisors observe their rail crews working.
  • The Injury graph shows that there was a marked decline in the number of railway related injuries to date in 2015.
  • The Assessment, Non-compliances and Recommendations graph shows there have been fewer assessments conducted year-to-date, although by the end of the year the numbers will be the same. Non-compliances are up marginally and recommendations are up. Recommendations are at the discretion of safety officers and reflect their belief that the infractions are minor in nature and do not warrant non-compliances.
  • The Railway Enforcement graph shows that we have issued four notices and orders this year in comparison to none for the previous year.
  • The As Found Condition graph gives the level of the hazard found in the non-compliances that were issued. The as found numbers are down year to date, however we expect to have similar numbers at year's end..

 

The 2015 Railway Safety Assessment topics included:

  • Proficiency Testing/Job Observation Records
  • Accident Record Review
  • Track Inspections
  • Railway Employee Survey
  • Annual SMS Audit
  • Rail Crew Training Certification
  • Locomotive or Car Moving Equipment Inspection Records
  • Confirmation of Railway Employee Medical Exams
  • Review of any Risk Assessment Conducted by the Railway in the last year

Annual Assessment – Observations from the Safety Officers from their Assessments:

  • Annual SMS Audits are still not being performed. Annual audits of each railways SMS is a requirement of the SMS Guidelines and necessary to ensure the SMS remains relevant.
  • Qualifications of railway trainers. BCSA noticed that not all employees performing the role of training supervisors were qualified to do the job.
  • Railways should be cognizant of the qualifications of the people they employ to train their railway employees, see the new BCSA Consultant Matrix available on our webpage.
  • Some railway consultants have been training IROR not CROR. IROR is an Alberta based rules package and is not recognized in BC. CROR training is required as it is consistent with the rules the service providers, CN & CP use.
  • Railways are often not familiar with the training requirements supplied in the matrix in the Railway Employee Qualification Standards regulation. CROR is being taught every 3 years, but employees are not getting the refresher in air brakes, TDG and Trackmobile Operation.
  • BCSA is still finding that remedial action dates are missing from track inspections reports. Ensure you go over your track inspections with your inspector and understand which items have to be dealt with immediately and document the repair dates.
  • BCSA safety officers have found that not all railway accidents are being reported to BCSA. This is a legal requirement and failure to report an accident can result in your risk level being raised to high with the attached fees.
  • Supervisor handovers still not occurring in industry.  New supervisors are put in place with little or no knowledge of the Railway Safety Program. BCSA has drafted a Railway Supervisor Transfer Process document available on our webpage to help railways understand what information is required to be transferred to the incoming supervisor.
  • Not all railway supervisors have undergone the training program provided to the employees they supervise.  Often the railway supervisor is not qualified to supervise the employees doing the job, and not able to perform job observations on the employees.

 

General Discussion

Preparation for your annual  railway safety assessment affects your annual fees.  BCSA scores each railway on the result of their annual assessment. If you are not prepared for the Railway Safety Officer’s visit this will work against your score. Railway Safety Officers continue to encounter new railway supervisors who have not received an adequate transfer of information from their predecessor. It is essential to railway safety on each industrial and heritage site that new supervisors are made familiar with the railway program and their obligations under their SMS. BCSA has created a Railway Supervisor Transfer Process document available on our webpage to assist railways in the smooth transfer of knowledge to the incoming railway supervisor.

  • Training standards continue to be scrutinized by Railway Safety Officers. It is the railway’s responsibility to ensure their employees are adequately trained to the standards set out in the regulations. It is also the railway’s responsibility to exercise their due diligence when hiring consultants to train their employees. To that end BCSA has developed a railway Consultant Matrix to assist railways in this process. Railways will be held accountable regarding who they hire to do their training. If a Railway Safety Officer after reviewing your documentation determines you have employed an unqualified consultant to train your employees you may be required to redo your training with a qualified individual.
  • Since Lac Mégantic Transport Canada has issued numerous changes to railway rules and regulations, which include the Grade Crossing regulation among others. Currently these changes have not been adopted by the province of BC and BCSA’s webpage continues to reflect the old rules and regulations. In the new year BCSA will review the changes made to the rules and regulations and recommend the province adopt the new versions. The exception being the new SMS regulation. BCSA has reviewed the new railway SMS regulation and decided to recommend the province not adopt it. It is BCSA’s opinion that the changes made to this regulation do not provide a higher level of safety to the Industrial and Heritage railways and do not warrant the time required by both BCSA and our railway clients for its implementation.
  • Railway Association of Canada (RAC) has recently issued a new version of CROR to become effective on October 14, 2015. BCSA has yet to review the difference package between the existing CROR and the new version regarding its effect on Industrial and Heritage railways. Once we have done so we will advise all concerned of the relevant changes to the applicable rules.
  • One of the changes made to the new railway SMS regulation is a significant emphasis on risk assessment. While BCSA will not be adopted the new SMS  regulation we will be looking at risk assessment on the railways we regulate. All railways are expected to conduct and document risk assessments when applicable. BCSA’s website now has a risk assessment form that railways may use to document this process.

Railway Accident Involving Crossing Collision

Railway Safety Advisory
Date of Issue: September 24, 2015
Advisory No. R2015-09-24

Topic

The following advisory is to inform provincially regulated railways of a railway related safety concern.

On September 21, 2015 an employee at an industrial site sustained injuries after the forklift he was operating was struck by a train as he attempted to cross the railway tracks. The accident occurred along a paved portion of the track that allows for crossing at any point within the rail yard.  

Compliance

While the results of the investigation into this event are still pending, all provincial

railways with tracks that have unlimited crossing locations within their yard must perform the following. As part of Section “E & F” within your Safety Management System (SMS), conduct and document a risk assessment as to where vehicles cross the tracks on your site and state what measures are in place to prevent collisions with railway equipment.  BCSA Railway Safety Officers will be reviewing the risk assessments during the 2016 audit season.

Additional Information

For more information about risk assessment you can follow these links:

http://safetyauthority.ca/sites/default/files/2015riskassessmentform.pdf

For additional information please contact the BCSA Railway Safety Program administration at 778‐396‐2044 or email at bcsa.railway@safetyauthority.ca

Eric Samuelson
Provincial Railway Safety Manager
British Columbia Safety Authority

Railway Supervisor Transfer Process

BCSA Railway Safety Program

The following document has been created to assist British Columbia provincial railways in managing their safety. Whenever a supervisor who is responsible for a railway’s Safety Management System (SMS) is replaced, the following process should occur.

The incoming supervisor must:

  • Be made aware of the railway’s SMS;
  • Be made conversant with the SMS document;
  • Contact BCSA as soon as possible to report the change and establish the new relationship;
  • Enter into a training program that provides them with a thorough understanding of railway operations;
  • Develop a clear understanding of the railway’s safety history;
  • Develop a clear understanding of the railway’s compliance history; and
  • Develop the ability to understand railway accidents and incidents;

The competent and qualified supervision of railway employees is the foundation of railway safety. Supervisors who have not been trained or provided with the knowledge to manage railway safety are a risk to safe railway operations. If a railway is replacing a supervisor, the provided list will help them quickly establish an understanding that will allow them to perform their duties.

BCSA is informing all provincial railways that failure to follow this process may lead to the termination of an annual audit, which may result in enforcement action against the railway.

Railway Risk Assessment Form